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Thread: Weird temp changes?!

  1. #1
    drreik is offline Junior Member
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    Exclamation Weird temp changes?!

    Greetings to everyone guys. I am a owner of as rock p67 extreme 4 gen 3 mobo . currently update to latest bios p2.20 .and also have installed
    asrockaxtu version 0/1/210 .also at power option plan have selected asrock extreme tuner utility .
    but the weird part is when i updated bios the mobo temp are stable as before , cpu not . the cpu ratio auto changes by own into 34x and back to 16x as shown into axtu software. when is stable at 16x cpu ration temp are 29c/84f idle running .at 34xcpu ratio temp goes at 36-38c or 99f idle running . stock i72600k cpu and stock cooler. is it normal or somthing weird at mobo . cpu vcore is 16xcpuratio at 0.978v.34x cpuration 1. something .
    anyone can help . thank you .
    Last edited by drreik; 02-13-2013 at 06:33 AM.

  2. #2
    odiebugs is offline Member
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    Default Re: Weird temp changes?!

    After you updated the BIOS did you set the BIOS to default, reboot, set to default, then reboot, and set the BIOS to your selected settings such as
    boot order, drive mode ?

    After updating did you run the windows experience index, you should.
    Last edited by odiebugs; 02-13-2013 at 07:59 AM.

  3. #3
    drreik is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: Weird temp changes?!

    Quote Originally Posted by odiebugs View Post
    After you updated the BIOS did you set the BIOS to default, reboot, set to default, then reboot, and set the BIOS to your selected settings such as
    boot order, drive mode ?.
    be more specific please.

  4. #4
    - wardog -'s Avatar
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    Default Re: Weird temp changes?!

    Quote Originally Posted by drreik View Post
    be more specific please.
    I believe what he was getting at was did you prior to flashing have any power state or other power saving features that you manually set in the BIOS? As flashing the BIOS will revert them to whatever the BIOS defaulted to, thusly erasing any changes you made prior. Is that why you're seeing these fluctuations?
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  5. #5
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    Default Re: Weird temp changes?!

    Quote Originally Posted by drreik View Post
    Greetings to everyone guys. I am a owner of as rock p67 extreme 4 gen 3 mobo . currently update to latest bios p2.20 .and also have installed
    asrockaxtu version 0/1/210 .also at power option plan have selected asrock extreme tuner utility .
    but the weird part is when i updated bios the mobo temp are stable as before , cpu not . the cpu ratio auto changes by own into 34x and back to 16x as shown into axtu software. when is stable at 16x cpu ration temp are 29c/84f idle running .at 34xcpu ratio temp goes at 36-38c or 99f idle running . stock i72600k cpu and stock cooler. is it normal or somthing weird at mobo . cpu vcore is 16xcpuratio at 0.978v.34x cpuration 1. something .
    anyone can help . thank you .
    Your BIOS update changed one or more CPU power saving options that were not enabled before. I doubt the default values that affect what you are seeing were just changed in that BIOS update, but who knows. You may have changed them yourself and forgot.

    That is not a problem at all, and is perfectly normal. One or more of the Intel CPU power saving options are enabled, and at least one is enabled by default.

    The main one is called Enhanced Intel Speed Step (EIST.) That varies the CPU multiplier for each core, depending upon the load on the CPU or cores.

    Note that given the Sandy Bridge CPU's standard clock speed, called Base Clock (or BCLK) of 100MHz, multiplied by the standard CPU multiplier of the i7-2600K, which is 34, produces the rated operating frequency of this CPU, of 3.4GHz (100Mhz x 34 = 3400Mhz, or 3.4Ghz.

    With EIST enabled, when the CPU is at idle or low load conditions, the CPU multiplier (optionally applied separately on each core, on all cores together, or one core only) changes from the standard value, for the CPU in question, of 34 to 16. So when the CPU multiplier is temporarily set to 16, the CPU core will operate at 1.6GHz (100MHz x 16 = 1600MHz, or 1.6GHz.) As soon as the load on the CPU or core increases, the CPU multiplier will change to 34, causing the core to operate at 3.4Ghz again. Of course a core running at the higher speed will be faster at doing work than at a lower speed. Occasionally you may see an intermediate CPU frequency, between 1.6GHz and 3.4GHz, such as 2.5GHz, but that is rare.

    Speed Step can be disabled, in which case the CPU cores will operate at 3.4GHz all the time, regardless of load. There is one normal exception to this.

    If you wondered how Intel "Turbo" boost works, it is done by changing the CPU multiplier. For this CPU, the rated Turbo speed is 3.8GHz. Turbo temporarily (in theory, more on that later) changes the multiplier to 38, for a CPU frequency of 3.8GHz (100MHz x 38 - 3800MHz, or 3.8GHz.)

    So given this CPU, not over clocked, with EIST and Turbo enabled, each core will be seen changing from 3.4GHz to 3.8GHz under high load, and down to 1.6GHz under low load. When a CPU core is running at the lower speed, it uses less power, and also then produces less heat, so it's temperature is lower, completely normal. At the higher core speeds, more power is used and more heat is produced, and of course its temperature is higher, again completely normal.

    Over clocking a Sandy Bridge and Ivy Bridge CPU is done by increasing the CPU multiplier above the standard value (34) and above the Turbo multiplier value (38), up to whatever value can be sustained by the CPU, given BIOS settings, etc. A multiplier of 44 or 45 should be fairly easy to reach for a good CPU, with very good cooling, and a decent mobo.

    Intel's Turbo feature was meant to be a temporary increase in CPU speed above the standard, rated frequency. Temporary means ~15 seconds, I don't recall the rated time, which varies depending on CPU temperature and load, etc. When using the stock Intel CPU cooler, or in laptop PCs, that makes sense. The increased heat and power use of the CPU at Turbo speed is undesirable in many situations.

    Fortunately for PC enthusiasts, the parameters controlling the length of time a multiplier above the standard CPU frequency is sustained can be adjusted. They can be set to infinite/continuous, or no time or power usage limit. That can be set in a board's BIOS internally (not adjustable by the user), or as user options in the BIOS. Mobo manufactures now set these settings to infinite by default, on boards sold as able to OC the CPU, which are very common. The user never needs to adjust these settings, unless they want to lower them. Of course, the CPU itself must support adjusting the CPU multiplier above the Turbo value, which only Intel 'K' CPUs do.

    What I do is enable EIST and Turbo, and have the CPU (also called Turbo) multiplier set to 44, on all cores. So my CPU's cores are operating at frequencies varying from 1.6GHz to 4.4Ghz, depending on the load. If I were to disable EIST, the CPU cores would run at 4.4GHz constantly. IMO, I don't need my CPU constantly running at 4.4GHz, since it runs cooler that way and uses less power. The switch between core speeds is very fast when just using EIST. Add other CPU power saving options like C1E/C States, that literally can stop instruction execution on a core, and it takes longer to wake up. We're still talking milliseconds here. But other users feel that a constant high OC gives the best performance, which is true, I chose the compromise for casual use, and can always change it.

    So what you are seeing it completely normal. CPU temperature does not stay constant at all, the core temps can change by 10 - 30C in one second, going from no load to full load. If I had my CPU multiplier set to 46, or run at 4.6GHz, with EIST enabled, my cores would change from 1.6GHz, to 4.6GHz in a fraction of a second. A jump of 3.0GHz is huge, it's amazing it works at all!

  6. #6
    drreik is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: Weird temp changes?!

    Quote Originally Posted by parsec View Post
    Your BIOS update changed one or more CPU power saving options that were not enabled before. I doubt the default values that affect what you are seeing were just changed in that BIOS update, but who knows. You may have changed them yourself and forgot.

    That is not a problem at all, and is perfectly normal. One or more of the Intel CPU power saving options are enabled, and at least one is enabled by default.

    The main one is called Enhanced Intel Speed Step (EIST.) That varies the CPU multiplier for each core, depending upon the load on the CPU or cores.

    Note that given the Sandy Bridge CPU's standard clock speed, called Base Clock (or BCLK) of 100MHz, multiplied by the standard CPU multiplier of the i7-2600K, which is 34, produces the rated operating frequency of this CPU, of 3.4GHz (100Mhz x 34 = 3400Mhz, or 3.4Ghz.

    With EIST enabled, when the CPU is at idle or low load conditions, the CPU multiplier (optionally applied separately on each core, on all cores together, or one core only) changes from the standard value, for the CPU in question, of 34 to 16. So when the CPU multiplier is temporarily set to 16, the CPU core will operate at 1.6GHz (100MHz x 16 = 1600MHz, or 1.6GHz.) As soon as the load on the CPU or core increases, the CPU multiplier will change to 34, causing the core to operate at 3.4Ghz again. Of course a core running at the higher speed will be faster at doing work than at a lower speed. Occasionally you may see an intermediate CPU frequency, between 1.6GHz and 3.4GHz, such as 2.5GHz, but that is rare.

    Speed Step can be disabled, in which case the CPU cores will operate at 3.4GHz all the time, regardless of load. There is one normal exception to this.

    If you wondered how Intel "Turbo" boost works, it is done by changing the CPU multiplier. For this CPU, the rated Turbo speed is 3.8GHz. Turbo temporarily (in theory, more on that later) changes the multiplier to 38, for a CPU frequency of 3.8GHz (100MHz x 38 - 3800MHz, or 3.8GHz.)

    So given this CPU, not over clocked, with EIST and Turbo enabled, each core will be seen changing from 3.4GHz to 3.8GHz under high load, and down to 1.6GHz under low load. When a CPU core is running at the lower speed, it uses less power, and also then produces less heat, so it's temperature is lower, completely normal. At the higher core speeds, more power is used and more heat is produced, and of course its temperature is higher, again completely normal.

    Over clocking a Sandy Bridge and Ivy Bridge CPU is done by increasing the CPU multiplier above the standard value (34) and above the Turbo multiplier value (38), up to whatever value can be sustained by the CPU, given BIOS settings, etc. A multiplier of 44 or 45 should be fairly easy to reach for a good CPU, with very good cooling, and a decent mobo.

    Intel's Turbo feature was meant to be a temporary increase in CPU speed above the standard, rated frequency. Temporary means ~15 seconds, I don't recall the rated time, which varies depending on CPU temperature and load, etc. When using the stock Intel CPU cooler, or in laptop PCs, that makes sense. The increased heat and power use of the CPU at Turbo speed is undesirable in many situations.

    Fortunately for PC enthusiasts, the parameters controlling the length of time a multiplier above the standard CPU frequency is sustained can be adjusted. They can be set to infinite/continuous, or no time or power usage limit. That can be set in a board's BIOS internally (not adjustable by the user), or as user options in the BIOS. Mobo manufactures now set these settings to infinite by default, on boards sold as able to OC the CPU, which are very common. The user never needs to adjust these settings, unless they want to lower them. Of course, the CPU itself must support adjusting the CPU multiplier above the Turbo value, which only Intel 'K' CPUs do.

    What I do is enable EIST and Turbo, and have the CPU (also called Turbo) multiplier set to 44, on all cores. So my CPU's cores are operating at frequencies varying from 1.6GHz to 4.4Ghz, depending on the load. If I were to disable EIST, the CPU cores would run at 4.4GHz constantly. IMO, I don't need my CPU constantly running at 4.4GHz, since it runs cooler that way and uses less power. The switch between core speeds is very fast when just using EIST. Add other CPU power saving options like C1E/C States, that literally can stop instruction execution on a core, and it takes longer to wake up. We're still talking milliseconds here. But other users feel that a constant high OC gives the best performance, which is true, I chose the compromise for casual use, and can always change it.

    So what you are seeing it completely normal. CPU temperature does not stay constant at all, the core temps can change by 10 - 30C in one second, going from no load to full load. If I had my CPU multiplier set to 46, or run at 4.6GHz, with EIST enabled, my cores would change from 1.6GHz, to 4.6GHz in a fraction of a second. A jump of 3.0GHz is huge, it's amazing it works at all!
    thanx mate. you help a lot. these temp are with open one side case. i dont have air flow system in system . it seem with asrock axtu made system heavy .now with intel extrme tuning even in 34x temp are same with 16x cpu ratio . do you recomend to oveclock cpu with stock cooler. or can i choose 4,2ghz in bios . thanx

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