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Thread: Dead computer (Possibly due to overheating)




  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Manila
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    Default Dead computer (Possibly due to overheating)

    Hi everyone,

    I already have my computer for about a year now. It normally works when I have it run continuously for about 2 days because I am running several simulation tasks. I normally just let the computer run without interruption until it finishes its task. Before I send another computer simulation, I give it a rest for about 12 hours (the computer is turned off). However, a day ago, I discovered that my computer just turned off without me sending it for a shut down. Unfortunately, I can no longer turn it on... No response from the PSU, its fan not running, CPU fan does not work, the switch does not light up!

    I have Intel for my processor and Asrock for my motherboard. I replaced the PSU but I can't seem to make the computer system work. I removed the RAM, HD, DVD and tested the PSU/CPU/Motherboard system, still it does not work. I forgot to remove the Video card so its actually the PSU/CPU/Motherboard/Videocard that I have tested. I suspect that Video card should not be blamed since the tasks (numerical computations) are not video-intensive nor did I call any routines that involve the video.

    The CPU fan is not moving and I read somewhere that if this is the case for a "dead" desktop then it is a problem with the motherboard. Is this true? I hope so because the CPU is expensive. Are there other ways I can pin down whether the CPU or the motherboard is the problem? Thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Calgary, Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    14

    Default Re: Dead computer (Possibly due to overheating)

    Questions:

    When was the last time the PC was thoroughly cleaned [components, fans removed and cleaned , new thermal paste on the CPU]?

    What were the temperatures like before the shutdown?

    Do the lights on the motherboard light up when PSU is powered on [does the mobo have lights on it to tell you if it's got power]?

    Have you checked for bad capacitors on the motherboard Badcaps.net - How To Identify

    Is this a DIY PC; or did you buy it "off-the-shelf", if you purchased it from a retailer, maybe it's still under warranty and the retailer/ manufacturer can take responsibility for it being dead.
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Manila
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    Default Re: Dead computer (Possibly due to overheating)

    I am not sure how to check the temperatures now that the computer is dead. I left it running for two days with minimal supervision only to find out it is turned off with the box and AVR already at room temperature. So sometime in between the computer just shut down.

    I don't see any bad capacitors on the motherboard. My PSU (and the new one I have) does not have a power on/off at the back. But when I turn on my AVR, I don't see any lights in the motherboard and I don't see any lights as well when I turn the computer's power button. The computer was purchased from a retailer about a year ago. The computer has not received any cleaning nor has it been given new thermal paste. Please help. Do I have a motherboard down or the CPU. Thanks.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Calgary, Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    14

    Default Re: Dead computer (Possibly due to overheating)

    So I'll ask this next question; how dusty is it inside the PC [especially in and around the CPU fan], are the fans all clogged with dust, are the intake fans/ passage ways clogged?

    If the CPU heatsink/ fan is clogged completely; it could the indicator as to why your PC finally shut itself down [clogged CPU fans/ heatsinks will eventually overheat the CPU, and possibly killing the CPU itself].

    Do a thorough cleaning of the insides of your PC [I recommend that you don't use a vacuum cleaner to suck the dust out, as any static electricity from the vacuum will kill the motherboard, and other components]; use cans of compressed air to removed the loose clumps of dust, take each of your components out one at a time and clean thoroughly.

    Grab yourself some thermal paste [found at any PC component retailer], clean off the old thermal paste [here's a "how to" if you don't already know how to do this Installing Thermal Compound (NCIX Tech Tips #11) - YouTube ], then apply the new paste...the attached video is pretty good-for a Canuck ;-)

    Once all the components and the inside of the chassis has been cleaned; reassemble, check to make sure all power connections are in place, then see if it powers up.

    If it turns out that the motherboard [and/ or CPU] is pooched, then you'll be looking at replacing one or both [or taking it to a reputable PC repair shop, where they can do a full diagnostic on it].

    Is there a possibility that there was power surge, as this could be the reason the PC is not powering up [surges can fry all the components inside a PC].
    __________________________________________________ __________________________________________________ _________________________________________________
    AMD Phenom II 965 BE, ASUS Sabertooth 990FX, Corsair Vengeance 16GB DDR3, Corsair Force GT Series SSD (120GB), WD VelociRaptor 300GB, HIS Radeon HD7950, NZXT Switch 810, XSPC Raystorm AMD CPU block, XSPC RX360, EK-DCP 4.0 pump, Windows 7 H.P. - 64 bit

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