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View Full Version : Modem won't connect at 56K



MagCynic
05-02-2002, 09:39 PM
I have a Modem Blaster v90 56K and whenever I connect, I can only manage to connect at 26.4. I doubt my ISP would be that slow cause I go through my college so what's the deal here?

Mr. C
05-03-2002, 08:15 AM
That is only indicating the initial connect speed.
The modem will constantly negotiate for a better connection, so that shouldn't be a problem. Often is the time I have a similar connect speed, but still DL at 4 t0 5Kb with a decent connection.

MagCynic
05-03-2002, 08:58 AM
I've looked at the transfer speed while downloading using GoZilla and it's always hovered around 2.6. Some of my settings have got to be wrong, but I can't figure out which ones.

Beefy
05-03-2002, 09:02 AM
The connection speed is still a fair indication that something is wrong. On the phone like you use, is there any static or crackling noises? If the line sounds a little dodgy, get it checked out.

Mr.Tweak
05-03-2002, 09:11 AM
If Windows is configured correctly, contact your telephone co.

MagCynic
05-03-2002, 09:19 AM
I've hooked up a laptop to the same line and connected at a lot faster speeds so I don't think it's the phone line. Plus they sound clear when I talk on the phone.

Beefy
05-03-2002, 09:43 AM
hmm.. that's interesting then.. Could be a few things:

a) your modem is crap

b) your settings are wrong

c) your ISP and your modem don't like each other.

d) There's a strange connection / intereference from something in / around your PC.


Just a few more questions: Are you using a long telephone cable to connect?

MagCynic
05-03-2002, 09:50 AM
hmm.. that's interesting then.. Could be a few things:

a) your modem is crap

b) your settings are wrong

c) your ISP and your modem don't like each other.

d) There's a strange connection / intereference from something in / around your PC.


Just a few more questions: Are you using a long telephone cable to connect?

a.) my modem is a Creative Labs Modem Blaster so at least i don't think it's crap
b.) i'm using the settings that my computer set up so i wouldn't have a clue if they're right
c.) i hope they make up
d.) i have a bunch of wires and speakers under my desk by my computer

and my telephone line goes about 2 or 3 feet to the wall

Beefy
05-03-2002, 09:59 AM
The cable length is good then. Does the cable run past any of the speakers or anything?

Albinus
05-03-2002, 11:47 AM
I've hooked up a laptop to the same line and connected at a lot faster speeds so I don't think it's the phone line.


How much faster? If it's over 33.6Kbps, then chances are you are not on a pair gained line, because that often restricts the connection speed to less than 33.6Kbps. However, if the laptop's modem is showing a connection of "56,667bps" or 115,200bps" then it is reporting the Data Terminal Rate - the rate the modem and computer are talking to each other - not the actual connection rate.

Other than that, my experiences with Creative modems is that they are very conservative when connecting, for instance one at my place connected at 46,667bps when a Banksia Wave 56 SP Dual connected at 53,333bps first go.

MagCynic
05-03-2002, 02:21 PM
My phone line runs through a whole mess of wires, some of which are probably the cords connecting my speakers to my sound card. And the laptop seemed to connect at 115 something if I can recall.

Albinus
05-03-2002, 02:34 PM
Well that explains things - the laptop is reporting the DTE rate (Computer to Modem) instead of the Modem-ISP rate. 26.4Kbps is very common if you are on a "RIM" or have a "Pair-gained" line.

The Australian Opposition Shadow Minister for I.T. has a website about pair gaining here (http://www.katelundy.com.au) and this is the info I extracted from there:




What is a RIM?

A RIM is a Remote Integrated Multiplexor. What does it do? It is what Telstra install when they run out of copper completely. Or when a new housing estate goes in.

What happens is that when there is not enough copper (not even enough to 'pair gain') to stretch into being 'enough', Telstra lay optical fibre from the exchange down to an intermediate spot.

At that spot a RIM is installed. These are typically visible as a box on the footpath. At the RIM, the fibre link is converted back into many copper lines - can typically be circa 250 lines that come out of one RIM. Those lines then go into each end users home.

In a "RIM" connected area (doesn't have to be rural - various exchanges in city Adelaide, for instance, are on them), 100% of the customers in those areas can't have ADSL broadband.




A pair gain is where a single line is split into two seperate lines, halving the bandwidth. How far are you from your local phone exchange? If you are further than 3 miles, then you will most likely not connect above 33.6Kbps, as copper wire attenuates markedly over long distances.