Please report all spam threads, posts and suspicious members. We receive spam notifications and will take immediate action!
Page 3 of 13 FirstFirst 12345 ... LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 129

Thread: ASRock Z87 Extreme 6 UEFI 1.90




  1. #21
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Pittsburgh
    Posts
    28

    Default Re: ASRock Z87 Extreme 6 UEFI 1.90

    Quote Originally Posted by parsec View Post
    SLK I've been experimenting with how low an override voltage I can set and boot, etc, which I will then apply to adaptive and see what I get. Still using UEFI 1.90 that is.


    That's the issue. When adaptive voltage is selected and you try to adjust the adaptive voltage... it won't adjust. It ends up being the same values from 0.80 all the way to 2v unless you add to the offset which just adds on top of the 1.3v I get.
    Last edited by SLK; 06-30-2013 at 02:16 PM.

  2. #22
    parsec's Avatar
    parsec is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Third stone from the sun
    Posts
    4,824

    Default Re: ASRock Z87 Extreme 6 UEFI 1.90

    Quote Originally Posted by SLK View Post
    That's the issue. When adaptive voltage is selected and you try to adjust the adaptive voltage... it won't adjust. It ends up being the same values from 0.80 all the way to 2v unless you add to the offset which just adds on top of the 1.3v I get.
    Yes, that is how it is, the end, with Adaptive voltage. Whether or not that is due to ASRock (no offense) or not, I don't know. My impression given what I've casually read in forum threads, is this is how Adaptive voltage works.

    FWIW, setting the multiplier/CPU Ratio to 38 (not an OC) with my i5-4670K, I selected Override Voltage for CPU and Cache and, set both to 0.850V. I set the Offset voltage for both to 0.200V. That booted right up fine, for a CPU core voltage reading of 1.047V. Ran AIDA stress tests, CPU + FPU, stable for 1/2 hour, core temps up to ~60C, CPU core voltage rock steady at 1.050V, 3.8GHz (I know, big deal), and that voltage never dropped when the cores dropped to 800MHz after testing.

    So back to the UEFI, everything the same except using Adaptive Voltage, same 0.850V and 0.200V Offset. Boot up and... wait, fails to boot, starts to but dies, WHEA_UNCORRECTABLE_ERROR. Ok, set it to 0.900V/0.200V, and still no boot, same error. Set it to 1.0V/0.200V, again no boot.

    Ok, sick of it, back to UEFI, still in Adaptive Voltage, change to Auto voltage and Offset. Still at a multiplier/CPU Ratio to 38. Of course it boots. What's my core voltage reading? 1.200V. Drops to... call it 0.755V. Back to AIDA64, run the same CPU+FPU test. Core voltage spiking up and down from 1.200V to 1.293V, core temps hitting the mid 80's.

    This reminds me of delidding the CPU. Same core clock speed, but 1.050V @ ~60C, and 1.200V - 1.293V @ ~80C, fixed vs adaptive voltage.

  3. #23
    Shiari is offline Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Nottingham
    Posts
    143

    Default Re: ASRock Z87 Extreme 6 UEFI 1.90

    Done some further verification, and actually, I'm not having the issues being described here. I hadn't noticed the minimum CPU for the balanced powerplan was set to 100%, that's what caused the higher clock and voltage. Set that 0%, and now all is happy again, and things are definitely a bit faster than with the older bioses.

    This is what it looks like now when idle:




    During the XTU CPU stress test (fwiw, temps in this test are a tad lower than in AIDA64 - would get to about 85c tops in there, which is about the max you should reach in these artificial tests):




    And after the XTU CPU stress test (isn't it curious how all three programs disagree on the actual clock speed?):





    My BIOS settings are largely default, most if it you can (and probably should) really leave on auto. If you're tweaking you should really have a reason to tweak what you are tweaking, plus you should have an understanding of what you are tweaking. As I don't have a clue what most of these settings do and no OC guide has told me to change them, I leave them alone :)

    OC #1:



    OC #2:



    OC #3:



    OC #4:




    And finally also the CPU configuration section ...





    TL;TMP: I'm quite content with this 1.90 bios so far. My overclock works as well and even better than before, and now that I've fixed the powerplan settings, it downclocks properly again.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Pittsburgh
    Posts
    28

    Default Re: ASRock Z87 Extreme 6 UEFI 1.90

    I bet IBT would set your vcore in the 1.35-1.4v range. I am attempting to run XTU to see where my voltage hits.

  5. #25
    Shiari is offline Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Nottingham
    Posts
    143

    Default Re: ASRock Z87 Extreme 6 UEFI 1.90

    Quote Originally Posted by SLK View Post
    I bet IBT would set your vcore in the 1.35-1.4v range. I am attempting to run XTU to see where my voltage hits.
    1.304V highest I've seen ... doesn't last long though, it'll quickly throttle itself back down (max temps were 100c). It is well documented by now however that artificial benchmarks can make it request more voltage than you've specified, and there's nothing you can (or should) do about that. It's not about the voltage anyway, it's about the temperatures you reach under day to day loads.

  6. #26
    parsec's Avatar
    parsec is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Third stone from the sun
    Posts
    4,824

    Default Re: ASRock Z87 Extreme 6 UEFI 1.90

    Quote Originally Posted by Shiari View Post
    1.304V highest I've seen ... doesn't last long though, it'll quickly throttle itself back down (max temps were 100c). It is well documented by now however that artificial benchmarks can make it request more voltage than you've specified, and there's nothing you can (or should) do about that. It's not about the voltage anyway, it's about the temperatures you reach under day to day loads.
    I agree with this about the highest voltage occurring only during the benchmarks when using adaptive voltages. It looks to me like you tried a built in OC setting, with a few tweaks, like lowering the cache multiplier (I agree that works well), is that correct?

    IMO, the differences in clock speed you have with those programs is simply a timing thing, when they each took a sample of data for their displays. None of these programs read continuously, they read at set intervals, every one or two seconds, AIDA64 allows you to set the sampling frequency, for example. The programs are not synchronized, and we know how quickly the core speeds can change. You could also ask, which core are they reading (all likely core 0), since each core is not locked to the same speed with Adaptive voltage, and power saving options enabled.

    Back to UEFI 1.90, so you've managed to get some control back that I said was gone in some cases. The question is, what settings (I see them, just discussing) are giving that back? Or is my earlier post about the fan speed, adaptive voltage setting, and Windows minimum processor power setting just wrong?

    Haswell over clocking has really changed my mind about all the synthetic benchmark programs. We accept them as being the ultimate arbiter of stability, and assume they make no mistakes, and have true value. Such as, you must have 12 hours of Prime95 without a BSOD, or the OC is not "stable". These programs can be coded to do virtually anything they want to do. How does an OS function when another program is using 100% of the CPU resources? The amount of underlying details that are ignored is amazing.

  7. #27
    Shiari is offline Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Nottingham
    Posts
    143

    Default Re: ASRock Z87 Extreme 6 UEFI 1.90

    My settings are indeed based originally on the 4.6 OC preset, though I didn't look at the differences between the defaults and the settings I pulled from my screenshots in 1.40. I more chose the preset to make sure that anything set by it and not being overridden by me should have an appropriate default.

    You're probably right about the differences in reported clock speeds. I've been programming for some 30 years, so I'm fairly aware of how things like polling work. :) Still, I think there should be some kind of standard API for it so programs don't have to reinvent the wheel over and over again, and users don't get as confused about programs reporting what's basically their own interpretation of a value.

    I never lost that control in UEFI as I never noticed not having it, so I'll admit I'm not sure what control you lost exactly or what settings from me would achieve anything related. Fan speed going to full in the bios is pretty common though, there's no such thing as idle states while in the bios (the OS puts the CPU to an idle state) and the CPU runs at full speed there, so cooling still needs to happen. Or am I misunderstanding something about the problem? My case and fans are pretty quiet, I don't usually hear any fan spin up at any time so I haven't noticed anything different related to fans from bios to bios.

    Stability testing on Haswell OC has indeed changed. While I can't say I've got experience OC'ing anything between the Q6600 and Haswell (the jump I made), I do know people swear by these stability tests ... and I've always considered them somewhat arbitrary. I may leave a stability test run for perhaps 30 minutes, but by then I'm already bored of it. I've not needed to go longer than that on Q6600 (3.6GHz), and not needed to go that long on Haswell. It's far better to throw a variety of tasks at it, even do some things while some benchmark or stresstest is running to also engage multitasking and more of the OS. In my experience the majority of BSOD's you'd ever see are driver related anyway. And then there's the issue that particularly older benchmarks/stresstest may not test newer features of the CPU.

    Sure, you do need some level of stress testing, or you can't determine "stable" to start with. But so far for me, on Haswell, a combination of XTU (not needed to go more than 5 minutes), AIDA64 (up to 15-20 minutes) and Handbrake as stress testing has yielded me full stability so far.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    4

    Default Re: ASRock Z87 Extreme 6 UEFI 1.90

    Quote Originally Posted by parsec View Post
    I agree with this about the highest voltage occurring only during the benchmarks when using adaptive voltages. It looks to me like you tried a built in OC setting, with a few tweaks, like lowering the cache multiplier (I agree that works well), is that correct?

    IMO, the differences in clock speed you have with those programs is simply a timing thing, when they each took a sample of data for their displays. None of these programs read continuously, they read at set intervals, every one or two seconds, AIDA64 allows you to set the sampling frequency, for example. The programs are not synchronized, and we know how quickly the core speeds can change. You could also ask, which core are they reading (all likely core 0), since each core is not locked to the same speed with Adaptive voltage, and power saving options enabled.

    Back to UEFI 1.90, so you've managed to get some control back that I said was gone in some cases. The question is, what settings (I see them, just discussing) are giving that back? Or is my earlier post about the fan speed, adaptive voltage setting, and Windows minimum processor power setting just wrong?

    Haswell over clocking has really changed my mind about all the synthetic benchmark programs. We accept them as being the ultimate arbiter of stability, and assume they make no mistakes, and have true value. Such as, you must have 12 hours of Prime95 without a BSOD, or the OC is not "stable". These programs can be coded to do virtually anything they want to do. How does an OS function when another program is using 100% of the CPU resources? The amount of underlying details that are ignored is amazing.
    Apparently I was doing something wrong earlier...

    I currently have my i7 OC'ed to 4.2. And the Voltages decrease: its currently idling at ~0.71V @ ~800MHz.

    I think the key setting, parsec, is the CPU OC Fixed mode. My first go around yesterday I had it on auto, which appears to default to Enabled. I set it to Disabled today, and the voltages go up and down with the frequency. I could be wrong, however.

    I have almost everything else on auto, except for the CPU Input Voltage which is currently set at Fixed 1.9V.

    So far so good, but I'm not sure what to think about having the Input Voltage set to fixed. Too new at OC'ing to know for sure. I need to do some more research before proceeding....

  9. #29
    parsec's Avatar
    parsec is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Third stone from the sun
    Posts
    4,824

    Default Re: ASRock Z87 Extreme 6 UEFI 1.90

    Quote Originally Posted by computatorium View Post
    Apparently I was doing something wrong earlier...

    I currently have my i7 OC'ed to 4.2. And the Voltages decrease: its currently idling at ~0.71V @ ~800MHz.

    I think the key setting, parsec, is the CPU OC Fixed mode. My first go around yesterday I had it on auto, which appears to default to Enabled. I set it to Disabled today, and the voltages go up and down with the frequency. I could be wrong, however.

    I have almost everything else on auto, except for the CPU Input Voltage which is currently set at Fixed 1.9V.

    So far so good, but I'm not sure what to think about having the Input Voltage set to fixed. Too new at OC'ing to know for sure. I need to do some more research before proceeding....
    I agree, the CPU OC Fixed mode does exactly what the... somewhat clear description does. I likely left it on Auto when testing the fixed/Override voltage, so I'm off to test that now. My earlier point was that with fixed/Override voltage, even when the core speed dropped to 800MHz, the voltage did not change from its highest value. So you are saying that CPU OC Fixed mode also keeps the voltage at the high level?

    Interesting your idle voltage is ~0.71 for your i7-4770K (I assume), which is different (lower) than Shiari's, which was ~0.8V IIRC. That could be due to his C-States settings, and the Minimum processor setting in Windows. I played around with Minimum processor, setting it to 0% which gives me 0.753V - 0.758V, on an i5-4670K. It did not increase the voltage until it hit 10% and again at 20%.

    Shiari, I am also a programmer, and we had no idea of our backgrounds, glad to know that now.

    IMO, even if the utilities were reading the clock speed on a synchronized clock cycle, if their polling rates were say every two seconds for one program, and AIDA64 is every five seconds (by default in the stress test), would skew the readings, as their readings coincide once every ten seconds. Plus you likely know the "readings" may involve a calculation, ie, the multiplier is read, not the core frequency, and the BCLK is read, and the value displayed is the product of the two.
    Last edited by parsec; 07-01-2013 at 11:37 AM.

  10. #30
    parsec's Avatar
    parsec is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Third stone from the sun
    Posts
    4,824

    Default Re: ASRock Z87 Extreme 6 UEFI 1.90

    Quote Originally Posted by computatorium View Post
    Apparently I was doing something wrong earlier...

    I currently have my i7 OC'ed to 4.2. And the Voltages decrease: its currently idling at ~0.71V @ ~800MHz.

    I think the key setting, parsec, is the CPU OC Fixed mode. My first go around yesterday I had it on auto, which appears to default to Enabled. I set it to Disabled today, and the voltages go up and down with the frequency. I could be wrong, however.

    I have almost everything else on auto, except for the CPU Input Voltage which is currently set at Fixed 1.9V.

    So far so good, but I'm not sure what to think about having the Input Voltage set to fixed. Too new at OC'ing to know for sure. I need to do some more research before proceeding....
    I'm not paying attention and reading your post thoroughly, as I get sick of other people doing at times...

    You are always using Adaptive voltage, which is fine and allows the CPU core voltage to drop with the multiplier. I've used that too. It's Override voltage that does not let the CPU core voltage drop, regardless of the CPU OC Fixed mode, I tried it disabled, and the CPU speed drops to 800MHz, but the voltage is the same, it does not change.

    What is interesting is even at idle/800MHz core speed, with the core voltage at 1.15V, the core temps are barely if any higher than at 0.755V. I need to double check that, but at worst the temps are a couple degrees C higher.

Page 3 of 13 FirstFirst 12345 ... LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •