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Thread: ASrock Bios explained




  1. #11
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    Default Re: ASrock Bios explained

    Quote Originally Posted by - wardog - View Post
    I have a few kits of that Samsung Magic Ram. It's worked in every board, AMD or Intel, myself and parsec have ever put it in. Suggest you start your own thread here. Parsec and myself are very very "educated' with that memory. PM me the link when you do.

    I have, AsRock Extreme 4 990FX bios glitch

    And the glitch acts differently between bios versions, so that fact it exists in more than bios version and in this guys intel board tells me they have something funny going on. It's nearly thesame exact bug in this guys' board and both bios version i tired on my board.

  2. #12
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    Default Re: ASrock Bios explained

    Quote Originally Posted by - wardog - View Post
    That's taking it a wee far isn't it?

    OP, now it's me that is confused. if I'm reading that CPU-z report correctly, why is your mem still running at 1333 JEDEC defaults? The i7-4790K is rated for 1600 stock.
    I agree. I am not sure why the memory is running at 1333. I can manually set it, but if I am reading posts on various tech sites correctly increasing the speed will also increase the voltage of the memory. Do I want to do that? The computer is fast and over clocks to 4.4gz, so no complaints here. But would it be faster (really how much faster does it need to be?) or will I just burn out the memory or worse the controller? Getting back to the BIOS. And I am really not trying to beat a dead horse. I just wish the help screen in the BIOS would give more information. Just a suggestion. I just wish the board was more forgiving of USB 2.0 devices connecting to USB 3.0. Same with the video card. I had to guess at what gen my card was to correctly set it. Thanks wardog for taking the time to read my posts.

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    Default Re: ASrock Bios explained

    I though USB was supposed to be FULLY backwards compatible?

    So what are you saying is if you up the speed you are not sure if it will burn up the RAM? I'd think since it's preset bios settings it shouldn't put it to high but, with the other bios glitches I wouldn't put it past it. @ 4.4ghz i'd think the CPU would get performance boost @ 1600mhz ram speed versus 1333mhz, this seems to be general consensus i read in various forums and threads.

    Unless it's the low voltage ram i'd probably give it ago. If burned up your ram, i'd try and RMA it or have AsRock replace it and if not, i'd just start telling people what happened and warn them to stay away fro mas rock. while OCing guaranteed, no pre set bios setting should fry your components as that's beyond bad.

  4. #14
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    Default Re: ASrock Bios explained

    OP, show me the SPD and Memory tabs of CPU-Z for your 2400Mhz mem. Remember to flip the slot choice on the SPD tab to show a slot with a stick in it to display specs.
    #1 - Please, when seeking help, enter the make and model of ALL parts that your system is comprised of in your Signature, or at least the model #'s in your System Specs, then "Save' it.
    ____If you are overclocking, underclocking, or undervolting any parts, informing us of this and their values would prove beneficial in helping you.


    #2 - Consider your PSU to be the foundation from which all else is built upon. Anything built upon a weak foundation is poorly built.

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    Default Re: ASrock Bios explained

    Quote Originally Posted by - wardog - View Post
    OP, show me the SPD and Memory tabs of CPU-Z for your 2400Mhz mem. Remember to flip the slot choice on the SPD tab to show a slot with a stick in it to display specs.
    ASrock Bios explained-memory1-jpg

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    Default Re: ASrock Bios explained

    Quote Originally Posted by rub900 View Post
    ASrock Bios explained-memory1-jpg
    ASrock Bios explained-slot-3-jpg

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    Default Re: ASrock Bios explained

    Quote Originally Posted by rub900 View Post
    ASrock Bios explained-slot-3-jpg
    ASrock Bios explained-slot1-jpg

  8. #18
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    Default Re: ASrock Bios explained

    rub900, I can understand your frustration with the UEFI/BIOS options and the lack of documentation and explanation of their purpose, etc. But I can assure you that you would find that ALL mother board manufactures do not provide the information that you are looking for. If you were to check the manual of any Z97 mother board, from ASUS, Gigabyte, MSI, etc, you'll only find a very basic description about the options. I'm not trying to defend ASRock, but just simply stating the reality of the situation.

    I can also tell you that having a degree in IT/Computer Science (which I do) will only help you in small ways when you build a PC and configure its BIOS options. It also depends upon what specific area your degree is in, if it is software for example, that will be very little help.

    A PC's BIOS options are specific to the board's components, based on the processor and chipset used (AMD or Intel) and are different depending on the generation of the processors. For example, Intel's Sandy Bridge and Ivy Bridge processors have some different options than your Haswell processor does, and AMD processors have other different options. There are some basic, common options shared by all current processors, but board manufactures may use different terminology, and have different options depending on the board. Many BIOS options are not static and defined once and never change, so any guide from several years ago will not be applicable to a new board's BIOS.

    As you saw, there are very few if any complete BIOS option explanation guides on the Internet, which seems astonishing, right? That is partially because BIOS options are closely tied to the CPU, chipset, and other mother board hardware. The hardware is the source of the terminology and technology, BIOS options just use it.

    Frankly, I learned about BIOS options over a long period of study, reading technical documents and forum guides about over clocking, for example. I would also suggest Wikipedia for basic explanations of the terms, it can be surprisingly useful.

    Here's the Intel datasheet for your processor, it hopefully will provide some of the basic information you need:

    Desktop 4th Gen Intel® Core? Processor Family: Datasheet, Vol. 1

    Since your board uses an Intel processor, and Intel has made many contributions to general PC technology, they are are great source of information about many PC related topics, like AHCI and RAID.

  9. #19
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    Default Re: ASrock Bios explained

    Quote Originally Posted by parsec View Post
    rub900, I can understand your frustration with the UEFI/BIOS options and the lack of documentation and explanation of their purpose, etc. But I can assure you that you would find that ALL mother board manufactures do not provide the information that you are looking for. If you were to check the manual of any Z97 mother board, from ASUS, Gigabyte, MSI, etc, you'll only find a very basic description about the options. I'm not trying to defend ASRock, but just simply stating the reality of the situation.

    I can also tell you that having a degree in IT/Computer Science (which I do) will only help you in small ways when you build a PC and configure its BIOS options. It also depends upon what specific area your degree is in, if it is software for example, that will be very little help.

    A PC's BIOS options are specific to the board's components, based on the processor and chipset used (AMD or Intel) and are different depending on the generation of the processors. For example, Intel's Sandy Bridge and Ivy Bridge processors have some different options than your Haswell processor does, and AMD processors have other different options. There are some basic, common options shared by all current processors, but board manufactures may use different terminology, and have different options depending on the board. Many BIOS options are not static and defined once and never change, so any guide from several years ago will not be applicable to a new board's BIOS.

    As you saw, there are very few if any complete BIOS option explanation guides on the Internet, which seems astonishing, right? That is partially because BIOS options are closely tied to the CPU, chipset, and other mother board hardware. The hardware is the source of the terminology and technology, BIOS options just use it.

    Frankly, I learned about BIOS options over a long period of study, reading technical documents and forum guides about over clocking, for example. I would also suggest Wikipedia for basic explanations of the terms, it can be surprisingly useful.

    Here's the Intel datasheet for your processor, it hopefully will provide some of the basic information you need:

    Desktop 4th Gen Intel® Core? Processor Family: Datasheet, Vol. 1

    Since your board uses an Intel processor, and Intel has made many contributions to general PC technology, they are are great source of information about many PC related topics, like AHCI and RAID.

    WELL SAID!!! That's what I was trying to say about the degree but, I said it in a more A hole/rude way, though not my intent. However the more I thought about it, I think he may have been stating that to give the person he is working with a better idea of his technical skills level.

    I do agree though experience is the best tool, book smarts only go so far but, I digress. I would add though in depth bios settings guide for a motherboard is probably a lot of work, i might venture to say that probably the highest end of mobos probably have such guide because most people upgrade after a few boards where a top of the line motherboard with have decent following and tend to age better and be used longer.

    I definitely understand not answering the question at hand and how that can be frustration. It's one my biggest sin and biggest complaints about online forums.

    However I digress So I'll stop there.

  10. #20
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    Default Re: ASrock Bios explained

    Quote Originally Posted by rub900 View Post
    ASrock Bios explained-slot1-jpg
    First, most if not all high performance memory has default/standard speed data that is used by a mother board when the memory speed option in the BIOS is set to Auto. All memory has multiple data entries about the appropriate speed and voltage settings it works with, in general that is called the SPD data.

    The default speed is not the advertized speed of the memory, and is always lower/slower than the advertized speed. Memory manufactures do this because they have no idea what the technical proficiency level of the user will be, or what board it will be used with, and they want to be certain that the memory will work when it is first put into a mother board. This is a "safety" feature they use, due to their experience with having the default memory speed set to the full/advertized speed. Some people will use the memory in a board/CPU combination that does not support the full speed of the memory, and when it fails to work for that reason, the user assumes the memory is defective when it really isn't. The manufacture also has to deal with their memory being used in all kinds of boards with many different BIOS', so the default speed data is conservative. So in a sense we have dumbed down default memory speed data programmed into all DRAM memory that is sold. Frankly, it is a good idea, and not an issue.

    This memory speed setting is definitely not a BIOS bug, the BIOS is doing exactly what it should be doing when the memory speed is set to Auto. JEDEC is an organization that defines RAM memory specifications, which is why you see "JEDEC" as the header of those columns. The behavior of your board's BIOS with your memory and having the memory speed option set to Auto is following JEDEC specs perfectly.

    You can see the default memory speed data in your screenshot, in the JEDEC #5 and #6 columns. They are set to 666/667MHz, so for DDR (Dual Data Rate) memory, the resulting speed is 1333Mhz.

    You can also see the XMP-2400 data columns, that is the data for the rated full speed of the memory. XMP is eXtreme Memory Profile, a specially identified set of SPD data. Your board's BIOS should have a XMP option setting that when enabled will tell the BIOS to automatically use the XMP data entry to set the memory speed. You can always set memory speed manually as well.

    Not all memory has XMP profile data included in its SPD data. One example of that is the Samsung Green/Miracle memory mentioned by Wardog, it does not have any XMP data. When no XMP data is found by a BIOS, the XMP option is not displayed. No problem, just set it manually.

    Higher speed memory tends to run at higher voltages, you may be able to reduce the voltage and still have the memory run at its highest rated speed. If you don't like the voltage set that high, you must check the specs of the memory before you buy it.

    If I may say, most of this explanation was needed for one BIOS option, Memory speed. IMO, this is an example of why we don't get decent explanations of BIOS options, the manual would be huge, and most people don't even read the manual. My real point is there is a lot of background information related to BIOS options, which I think is really what you are interested in, at least in some cases. It took me years to learn all this, from various sources. Welcome to PC building.

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