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Thread: Fata1ty z68 - Sandy Bridge - Bios 2.10




  1. #1
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    Default Fata1ty z68 - Sandy Bridge - Bios 2.10

    Is it safe to update my Fatal1ty z68 Pro Gen3 with a i7 2700k (SB CPU) to bios 2.10? Then 2.20?

    Some questions:
    1. Can you put multiple BIOS files on the USB pendrive? 2.10 and 2.20.

    2. Should I remove my GTX 580 and hook my monitor up to the on-board port?

    3. Will 2.10 will still support my gtx 580?

    4. Should I also disconnect my hard-drive, optical drive, and sound card?

    Thanks!
    Last edited by tmt; 10-31-2014 at 05:22 AM. Reason: additonal questions
    Motherboard: ASRock Fatal1ty Z68 Professional Gen3
    CPU: Intel i7-2700k 3.5Ghz
    GPU: MSI Geforce 580 GTX Lightning Xtreme 3GB
    RAM: 8GB (2x4GB) G.Skill Ripjaws X
    HDD: 1TB Western Digital 7200RPM
    ODD: Generic DVD
    Sound: Asus Xonar Essence STX
    PSU: Corsair 1000W Silent Pro
    OS: Windows 7 Ultimate 64 Bit
    BIOS: P1.30

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    Default Re: Fata1ty z68 - Sandy Bridge - Bios 2.10

    Quote Originally Posted by tmt View Post
    Is it safe to update my Fatal1ty z68 Pro Gen3 with a i7 2700k (SB CPU) to bios 2.10? Then 2.20?
    What is the purpose of updating to the Ivy Bridge compatible BIOS version?

    It is potentially dangerous to apply the 2.10 BIOS if the update is not done correctly.

    Using a USB flash drive inserted into a USB 2.0 port on the board's IO panel, you start Instant Flash from the BIOS and allow the BIOS update to complete.

    When it completes and the PC restarts, you must leave the flash drive in the PC until Windows fully boots. If you don't do that, an additional part of this update will fail! Once you have a failed SB to IB BIOS update, recovering from it is virtually impossible, and you will need to replace the CMOS/BIOS chip on the board.

    You must also update the Intel IME software, F-Stream utility, and onboard graphics driver, if you use it.

    If you don't follow these instructions exactly, the update will fail, and you will regret it when the PC no longer works correctly.

    Quote Originally Posted by tmt View Post
    Some questions:
    1. Can you put multiple BIOS files on the USB pendrive? 2.10 and 2.20.
    The versions of Instant Flash on newer ASRock boards work fine with multiple BIOS versions on a flash drive. Each version is listed and you can choose the one you want. I've never used your board so cannot be 100% sure the version of Instant flash you have will be the same. It's easy enough to test that.

    Quote Originally Posted by tmt View Post
    2. Should I remove my GTX 580 and hook my monitor up to the on-board port?
    Using onboard graphics has never been a requirement of these BIOS updates. It won't hurt to do that, but any BIOS update will cause all default values to be selected after the update. Normally the board will boot fine even if the video source is set to onboard graphics, the default value.

    Quote Originally Posted by tmt View Post
    3. Will 2.10 will still support my gtx 580?
    If the previous BIOS version you used supported that video card, these versions should too. That is the best I can tell you about that.

    Quote Originally Posted by tmt View Post
    4. Should I also disconnect my hard-drive, optical drive, and sound card?

    Thanks!
    Again, no requirements to do any of that. You want (need) the PC to fully boot into the OS right after the 2.10 update, since the Intel IME firmware (part of the BIOS) is updated at that time, not during the BIOS flash itself.

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    Default Re: Fata1ty z68 - Sandy Bridge - Bios 2.10

    I bought new RAM (GSkill Trident X) that appears to be incompatible with the 1.30 BIOS. The new RAM requires a tRFC of at least 350 and on 1.30 BIOS the tRFC is locked at 255. I've worked with GSKill Tech to try to get the RAM working with 1.30 but to no resolve. My only options are to either RMA the RAM or update my BIOS.

    I understand the update process and how it is imperative to leave the USB drive in until OS boots - I've read your "IMPORTANT BIOS Update Information" thread. I thank you for re-outlining the procedure.

    I'm just nervous that after I reboot after the UEFI update, I'll get no display or my computer won't boot. What should I do in that circumstance? If I reboot, won't that jeopardize the update and corrupt my bios chip? That's why I asked about whether to use the gtx 580 or onboard and removing extra hardware such as the sound card/optical drive/etc. I want this to go smoothly! :)

    Forgive my nervousness, this is my first time updating BIOS.

    Thanks for helping!
    Motherboard: ASRock Fatal1ty Z68 Professional Gen3
    CPU: Intel i7-2700k 3.5Ghz
    GPU: MSI Geforce 580 GTX Lightning Xtreme 3GB
    RAM: 8GB (2x4GB) G.Skill Ripjaws X
    HDD: 1TB Western Digital 7200RPM
    ODD: Generic DVD
    Sound: Asus Xonar Essence STX
    PSU: Corsair 1000W Silent Pro
    OS: Windows 7 Ultimate 64 Bit
    BIOS: P1.30

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    Default Re: Fata1ty z68 - Sandy Bridge - Bios 2.10

    After any BIOS update, a restart of the PC is required, you really don't have the option not to do so. You won't be using the new BIOS until you restart the PC. A reboot would not jeopardize or corrupt a BIOS update.

    I don't know how many times I've updated the BIOS on my boards, to many times to remember. I've never had a failure that ruined the board, or really ever had a failure. It's not a dangerous thing, I've updated using a video card and onboard graphics, no difference IMO.

    The BIOS 2.10 update is an unusual update, since it does more than the typical BIOS update. But as long as you do things correctly, it will be fine. Plus you MUST reboot for the process to complete, and leave the flash drive in the PC until it completely reboots. That is the part people don't do and ruin the update.

    Plus all the BIOS setting values are reset to default values after a BIOS update. You may need to change some of them if you use settings other than default values.

    Your memory at 1600 should easily work in your board. The "locked" tRFC would be cleared if you cleared the CMOS/BIOS after installing your new memory, that is required when changing memory.

    If you haven't cleared the CMOS/BIOS since you installed your new memory, that may be all you need to do to get it working. Also safer than doing an update... since nothing is updated.

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    Default Re: Fata1ty z68 - Sandy Bridge - Bios 2.10

    Quote Originally Posted by parsec View Post
    Your memory at 1600 should easily work in your board. The "locked" tRFC would be cleared if you cleared the CMOS/BIOS after installing your new memory, that is required when changing memory.

    If you haven't cleared the CMOS/BIOS since you installed your new memory, that may be all you need to do to get it working. Also safer than doing an update... since nothing is updated.
    Thank you for responding parsec.

    I just tried this but unfortunately my RAM still does not work. The tRFC remains locked at 255 even after clearing the CMOS and resetting the BIOS to their defaults.

    I'll state the process that I did:
    Turn computer off, unplug power cord and flip PSU switch. Wait a minute. Hold Power button for 5 seconds just to be safe.
    Remove old RAM. Insert one module of the new RAM into slot A2.
    Hold "CLR CMOS" button on back of I/O panel for 5 seconds.
    Replug Power cord, flip PSU switch. Turn on computer.
    The computer states BIOS values were reset to their defaults. I press F2 to enter BIOS and reset to defaults and save/exit (Perhaps this step was redundant).
    Restart, go back into BIOS. Load XMP profile 1. tRFC still locked at 255. :(

    If I use more than one module of RAM, the computer will not boot. Dr. Debug shows an error code of 45 which, in the manual, means "OEM post memory initialization code".

    So now, my only options remain the same as before. Update BIOS to 2.10->2.20 even though I WON'T be upgrading to an Ivy Bridge CPU or RMA the RAM for slightly slower Ripjaws.

    Since you are way more experienced than I am at this stuff - What would you recommend?

    Thanks again!
    Last edited by tmt; 11-02-2014 at 03:56 AM.
    Motherboard: ASRock Fatal1ty Z68 Professional Gen3
    CPU: Intel i7-2700k 3.5Ghz
    GPU: MSI Geforce 580 GTX Lightning Xtreme 3GB
    RAM: 8GB (2x4GB) G.Skill Ripjaws X
    HDD: 1TB Western Digital 7200RPM
    ODD: Generic DVD
    Sound: Asus Xonar Essence STX
    PSU: Corsair 1000W Silent Pro
    OS: Windows 7 Ultimate 64 Bit
    BIOS: P1.30

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Fata1ty z68 - Sandy Bridge - Bios 2.10

    You did a perfect CMOS/BIOS clear, and loading the defaults over again manually is fine and hurts nothing. Now the obvious dawned on me about your memory, I'm surprised G.SKILL did not suggest this to you.

    But I'll first say that the tRFC value being "locked" does not make sense. So you literally cannot change the value in that field once it is selected/highlighted by:

    Backspacing to clear it and then entering a value.

    Pressing the keyboard's + or - key to increase or decrease the value.

    Clearing it as above and typing in "Auto".

    Otherwise, I assume that you cannot enter a value beyond 255, which is apparently the greatest value allowed currently in that field? The UEFI/BIOS of my Z87 board allows tRFC values of up to 511 to be entered.

    I'm using 16GB of memory running at 1800, and the tRFC is set to 107. Yes, one hundred and seven (107). The need for a tRFC setting of 350 for your memory seems a bit excessive.

    So I looked around and found this, scroll down to the first CPU-Z screen shot on the left:

    G.Skill TridentX 32 GB CAS7 F3-1600C7Q-32GTX Review | techPowerUp

    Those are supposed to be the settings from the XMP profile at 1600. Note that the tRFC is 208. That is with a full 32GB.

    In that review they OC'd your memory to 2400, which is shown below the first screenshot of 1600. As 2400 the tRFC is 313.

    If you mention this to G.SKILL, they'll say your memory controller (in your CPU) is different, and needs tRFC to be increased. That is true, but you're slowing down one type of operation of your memory to compensate for a faster operation elsewhere, so is it worth it?

    So try this: Simply do not load the XMP profile. Enter the values manually or let them just be Auto. Or is Auto for tRFC 255, and always the maximum value?

    All XMP does is automatically set some of the main parameter settings for a memory module, that are not the default, slower, standard settings, they are the higher performance settings. Any and all of those settings can be done manually in the BIOS, XMP is merely a convenience.

    All the memory parameter settings are already programmed into your memory, and it probably has at least three sets of settings, each for a different speed.

    Updating to the 2.10 or other BIOS assumes it will "unlock" the apparent tRFC current limit of 255. That might happen, and it might not. Who knows if that will be true or not? What if tRFC does increase, but to 300 or 325?

    I know I'm not making this easier for you to decide, but I want you to understand as much as possible. Personally, I hate what I call "magic fixes", where something like a BIOS update fixes some issue, but it is never understood what was done. Or hoping something will change in a BIOS, as you are, with little or no indication that it actually will. If G.SKILL knows that the BIOS for Ivy Bridge processors have their tRFC field range expanded beyond 255 due to the increase in memory speed or OC ability of the memory, then that is a clue it could happen. Otherwise unless someone with your board and the 2.10 or 2.20 BIOS can tell you if tRFC range is increased, it is just hope and faith that it will happen.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Fata1ty z68 - Sandy Bridge - Bios 2.10

    Quote Originally Posted by parsec View Post
    You did a perfect CMOS/BIOS clear, and loading the defaults over again manually is fine and hurts nothing. Now the obvious dawned on me about your memory, I'm surprised G.SKILL did not suggest this to you.

    But I'll first say that the tRFC value being "locked" does not make sense. So you literally cannot change the value in that field once it is selected/highlighted by:

    Backspacing to clear it and then entering a value.

    Pressing the keyboard's + or - key to increase or decrease the value.

    Clearing it as above and typing in "Auto".

    Otherwise, I assume that you cannot enter a value beyond 255, which is apparently the greatest value allowed currently in that field? The UEFI/BIOS of my Z87 board allows tRFC values of up to 511 to be entered.
    Nope, I cannot raise it above 255. It has a description below the tRFC field that says "Max: 255".

    Apparently this was the case with the Z68/Z77/P67 boards as Tradesman over at the GSkill Tech forums said:
    Quote Originally Posted by Tradesman
    "If any trouble w/ prime I'd guess a few things, first if running the tRFC at 255, that's tight, the sticks actually look to about 278 for tRFC, I originally got sets running at 255 on ASRock Z77/P67 and Z68 mobos because that was the max that was allowed..."
    Quote Originally Posted by parsec View Post
    I'm using 16GB of memory running at 1800, and the tRFC is set to 107. Yes, one hundred and seven (107). The need for a tRFC setting of 350 for your memory seems a bit excessive.

    So I looked around and found this, scroll down to the first CPU-Z screen shot on the left:

    G.Skill TridentX 32 GB CAS7 F3-1600C7Q-32GTX Review | techPowerUp

    Those are supposed to be the settings from the XMP profile at 1600. Note that the tRFC is 208. That is with a full 32GB.
    Those are my exact settings when I enable XMP Profile 1. tRFC is 208.

    Quote Originally Posted by parsec View Post
    In that review they OC'd your memory to 2400, which is shown below the first screenshot of 1600. As 2400 the tRFC is 313.
    Yea, I really don't know why GSKill told me to increase to 350, that does seem excessive, especially after looking at this review. I don't plan to overclock to 2400 and I believe I can't anyways (Isn't 1600 max for Sandy Bridge?) so tRFC of 208 should be working fine for me.


    Quote Originally Posted by parsec View Post
    So try this: Simply do not load the XMP profile. Enter the values manually or let them just be Auto. Or is Auto for tRFC 255, and always the maximum value?
    I'll try this later and get back to you.

    Quote Originally Posted by parsec View Post
    Updating to the 2.10 or other BIOS assumes it will "unlock" the apparent tRFC current limit of 255. That might happen, and it might not. Who knows if that will be true or not? What if tRFC does increase, but to 300 or 325?

    I know I'm not making this easier for you to decide, but I want you to understand as much as possible. Personally, I hate what I call "magic fixes", where something like a BIOS update fixes some issue, but it is never understood what was done. Or hoping something will change in a BIOS, as you are, with little or no indication that it actually will. If G.SKILL knows that the BIOS for Ivy Bridge processors have their tRFC field range expanded beyond 255 due to the increase in memory speed or OC ability of the memory, then that is a clue it could happen. Otherwise unless someone with your board and the 2.10 or 2.20 BIOS can tell you if tRFC range is increased, it is just hope and faith that it will happen.
    I can't find anything information online regarding that 2.10/2.20 for the Z68 unlock or increase the tRFC lock. Therefore, updating would indeed be a gamble.

    One thing to note is that the Tridents came out AFTER the 1.30 BIOS. Perhaps 2.10/2.20 address the tridents and provide compatibility for them. However, no information online that I can find. Therefore, another gamble.

    I really wish ASRock would have detailed changelogs for their BIOS versions...

    EDIT: Just found thread regarding the same memory and the tRFC lock.
    Quote Originally Posted by Tradesman
    "...I'm running the same sticks with a 3570K on a ASRock mobo (and helped ASRock get their BIOS up to date, these take a 300+ tRFC and when I got the set they had a 255 lock on the tRFC, now they have the BIOS good to go)"
    According to this, if I'm reading it correctly, the later BIOS versions do increase the tRFC lock. Tradesman also indicates the tRFC does need to be higher than 300 for the Tridents.

    EDIT: http://www.gskill.us/forum/showthread.php?t=11739
    This guy has the same motherboard and almost identical CPU as mine. He upgraded to BIOS 2.20 and is able to use the Tridents (Although different Tridents).
    Last edited by tmt; 11-03-2014 at 01:15 AM.
    Motherboard: ASRock Fatal1ty Z68 Professional Gen3
    CPU: Intel i7-2700k 3.5Ghz
    GPU: MSI Geforce 580 GTX Lightning Xtreme 3GB
    RAM: 8GB (2x4GB) G.Skill Ripjaws X
    HDD: 1TB Western Digital 7200RPM
    ODD: Generic DVD
    Sound: Asus Xonar Essence STX
    PSU: Corsair 1000W Silent Pro
    OS: Windows 7 Ultimate 64 Bit
    BIOS: P1.30

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Fata1ty z68 - Sandy Bridge - Bios 2.10

    Nice find about the Trident memory and the ASRock boards (other makes could have been similar), but I've never had to deal with any memory settings like that. The tRFC is clearly limited to 255 with your BIOS version.

    Given what you wrote above, I doubt that you'll be able to get the tRFC beyond 255 with your current BIOS using an Auto setting, or anything else.

    Actually, the memory specs for any of the i7 or i5 Sandy Bridge processors list a max of 1333: ARK | Intel® Core

    That speed is what Intel guarantees will work, and it is very common to go beyond 1333, 1600 is really a given for any i7-2xxxK processor. Going above 1600 is not at all impossible. I've run my i7-2600K with the memory at 1600 from the first day I used it, with G.SKILL memory (RipJaws and Sniper models), and at 1866 with the crazy good but no longer manufactured Samsung "Green" memory. But that is on an ASRock Z77 board.

    Just an example of the memory speed I just talked about above:

    Fata1ty z68 - Sandy Bridge - Bios 2.10-2600k-memory-speed-png

    Not meant to tease/torture you, but you can see the tRFC is 110, running at 1600 with G.SKILL memory. That memory is an older model, it is rated as 1600 and running at 1600. Another example for you when talking with G.SKILL. No special manual memory settings were needed, that is the XMP profile of that memory.

    Did you get all 32GB of the Trident memory running at say 1333? That is without the XMP profile active and with default/Auto memory settings? Using 1333 or even 1066 might at least get the PC running with that memory. Better working at a lower speed than not at all IMO, at least until the tRFC thing can be worked out. I think you should at least try 1333 or 1066, just to verify the memory works correctly.

    Have you tried increasing the memory voltage, or did the XMP profile set it to 1.65V? It looks like the XMP profile uses 1.5V. But if the tRFC setting is the limiting factor, voltage won't change that.

    Apparently, the memory controller in Sandy Bridge processors need a looser tRFC setting to work with the Trident memory, that review used a new Haswell CPU. Meanwhile, you can see my 2600K with 16GB of G.SKILL memory at 1600, tRFC of 110.

    As I said earlier, the XMP profile is a set of data values for many of the memory settings that is programmed by the manufacture. The tRFC value of 208 was put there by G.SKILL. You aren't doing anything wrong.

    I'm beginning to wonder if your Trident memory is compatible with your processor's memory controller. That is why I highly suggest trying it at a lower speed, 1066 or 1333, just to see if it will work and the PC will boot. You shouldn't need a higher tRFC at the lower speeds.

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    Default Re: Fata1ty z68 - Sandy Bridge - Bios 2.10

    Quote Originally Posted by parsec View Post
    Not meant to tease/torture you, but you can see the tRFC is 110, running at 1600 with G.SKILL memory. That memory is an older model, it is rated as 1600 and running at 1600. Another example for you when talking with G.SKILL. No special manual memory settings were needed, that is the XMP profile of that memory.
    My current RAM GSkill Ripjaws X 8GB runs flawlessly using XMP at 1600 8-8-8-24-1T and tRFC of 130. I've been running them that way for three years! Very stable - never had any problems.

    Quote Originally Posted by parsec View Post
    Have you tried increasing the memory voltage, or did the XMP profile set it to 1.65V? It looks like the XMP profile uses 1.5V. But if the tRFC setting is the limiting factor, voltage won't change that.
    It uses 1.5v. I've read not to go above 1.5v as it can potentially damage the processor. However, about a week ago, I raised the VTT voltage to 1.14 from 1.05 (A suggestion by someone) but all that did was freeze my computer.


    EDIT: I just ran some several tests.

    I checked each slot by installing a single module and booting. All slots work.
    I checked that the paired slots work. A1/B1 and A2/B2 by installing two modules and booting each. That works.
    I did those checks with my RipJaws.

    I did the following two tests on the Tridents.
    Inserted Trident into A1. Changed DRAM voltage to 1.515, tRFC to 255, XMP Profile 1, as well as manually entered the timings. 7-8-8-24-2N.
    It booted fine with the one Trident installed.
    Powered down. Inserted remaining Tridents.
    Computer reached the farthest I've seen with all four Tridents installed. It got to the BIOS splash screen then my computer froze. I rebooted and Dr. Debug showed error code 45.
    I had to take out three tridents for it to boot again.

    Reset DRAM voltage to 1.5. Disabled XMP. Changed frequency to 1333Mhz. Timings manually entered. tRFC set to 255.
    It booted fine with the one Trident installed.
    Powered down. Inserted remaining Tridents.
    Computer wouldn't boot. Error 45.

    Timings set to Auto. tRFC set to Auto.
    It booted fine with the one Trident installed.
    Powered down. Inserted remaining Tridents.
    Computer wouldn't boot. Error 45.

    The computer is always able to boot with only one Trident installed regardless of the settings it seems. Any more than that and problems ensue - mainly error code 45.


    I think it's safe to say at this point that BIOS 1.30 does not properly support the GSKill Tridents. I would continue testing but I only have 15 days left to RMA. I need to make a decision.

    1) Update BIOS to 2.10->2.20. Spend a couple days testing, if that fails, RMA. Potentially order a new BIOS chip as well if all ends in complete disaster.. (Ugh)
    2) Don't risk the update, just RMA the Tridents for Ripjaws instead.

    What would you recommend?

    Thanks!
    Last edited by tmt; 11-03-2014 at 11:44 AM.
    Motherboard: ASRock Fatal1ty Z68 Professional Gen3
    CPU: Intel i7-2700k 3.5Ghz
    GPU: MSI Geforce 580 GTX Lightning Xtreme 3GB
    RAM: 8GB (2x4GB) G.Skill Ripjaws X
    HDD: 1TB Western Digital 7200RPM
    ODD: Generic DVD
    Sound: Asus Xonar Essence STX
    PSU: Corsair 1000W Silent Pro
    OS: Windows 7 Ultimate 64 Bit
    BIOS: P1.30

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Fata1ty z68 - Sandy Bridge - Bios 2.10

    Nice work doing what you did. While not optimal, did you try two DIMMs, inserted into A2 and B2, usually the two slots suggested for the best compatibility.

    In your BIOS, in the DRAM configuration screen, do you have an option called (something like) MRC Fast Boot? Usually way at the bottom of the screen, scroll down to find it.

    If you do, set it to Disabled. That will cause what is called "DRAM Training" to occur when you start the PC, during POST. That helps with memory compatibility, but is not a guaranteed fix for your problems. It takes more than one POST run for the memory to be "trained", how many it takes is unknown to me, probably variable. Just something else to try.

    Overview of your options:

    BIOS Update:
    I know that users of boards like yours have successfully updated their boards to an Ivy Bridge compatible BIOS, while still using a Sandy Bridge CPU. There are examples of that in my thread about this topic. As long as you perform the 2.10 update correctly, you will be fine. Do NOT skip to 2.20, 2.10 MUST be applied or you won't get the IME firmware update, which is really the only critical part of this BIOS update.

    To do that all you need to do is keep the USB flash drive with the 2.10 BIOS file connected to the PC until it FULLY REBOOTS to the Windows desktop after Instant Flash completes. There is ZERO danger keeping the USB Flash drive in the PC, why people feel the need to remove it right away is beyond me. It's not bootable, or will NOT automatically cause an Instant Flash process to start. Nothing will happen with the flash drive connected once Windows boots, except a file explorer window will open for the flash drive, if that is your default action for flash drives. I sometimes forget the flash drive I used for a BIOS update is connected to the PC, and realize much later that it is there. The Instant Flash method is also the most reliable BIOS update method you can use, and is the only method I ever use.

    After the PC boots into Windows, the update process is complete. You then need to run the IME software installer specified, it is compatible with the new IME firmware installed during the BIOS update process. That is the Intel Management Engine driver ver:8.0.2.1410 available on your board's download page. If you use the F-Stream utility you need to install the new version of that. The Intel onboard graphics driver is not necessary, since that is only for the different graphics used by Ivy Bridge processors.

    Don't get nervous and shut off power to the PC during the BIOS update, as that will corrupt the BIOS. Worst case situation, if somehow your BIOS is ruined and the PC won't POST, you can get a new BIOS chip from ASRock (or eBay) which is easily replaceable, and the board will work fine again.

    If your PC usage requires you to have 32GB of memory, and you don't want to RMA the memory, then do the BIOS update.

    f you have no other reason to update your memory than you just feel like it, and cannot be without the PC for any time if you have a problem, then RMA the memory. G.SKILL might even swap another model for you, isn't this model basically the same as what you were using:

    G.SKILL Ripjaws X Series 32GB (4 x 8GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model F3-1600C9Q-32GXM - Newegg.com

    Personally, the BIOS update would not scare me, I would just do it. My ASRock Z77 board has 13 BIOS updates, and I installed every one of them, never had a problem with the update process using Instant Flash.

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