Please report all spam threads, posts and suspicious members. We receive spam notifications and will take immediate action!
Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: 8 pin and 4 pin cpu power connectors on MB




  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    9

    Default 8 pin and 4 pin cpu power connectors on MB

    Hi All,

    I'm not sure what to attach to my auxiliary CPU power connectors. I have an 8 pin and a 4 pin CPU connector on my ASRock X99 Professional MB. Currently I have a cable to the 8 pin CPU connector (and the 24 pin cable) attached. Do I also need to connect an additional cable to the 4 pin connector as well? If so what do I gain from this? Currently the pc seems to be functioning okay without it except when the pc comes out of hibernation where it freezes up. For my boot drive I have the Samsung m.2 XP941 SSD. Thanks

  2. #2
    parsec's Avatar
    parsec is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Third stone from the sun
    Posts
    4,824

    Default Re: 8 pin and 4 pin cpu power connectors on MB

    Since both the eight and four pin connectors are for CPU power, using both has the potential of providing more power to the CPU. If the board's manual does not say you should connect cables to both connectors as a standard configuration, then both are not necessary. For your system, use the eight pin connector as the standard connection, and the four pin as optional.

    Whether you need more power to the CPU, or if it will even use/need it another story. If you have a high over clock on your processor, and tend to operate it at high usage levels for long periods of time, then using both connections could be beneficial.

    Given this situation, or not, using both connections provides more conductors (wires) to provide power to the CPU and reduces the possibility of any heat related problems in the cables from the PSU, and the connectors on the board.

    On very rare occasions I have seen pictures of burnt/melted eight pin CPU connectors and cables, but I suspect that is usually caused by a poor connection or a PSU problem.

    The PSU being used is also a factor, is it capable of high power output, or if uses a multiple rail design. In the latter case, distributing the power draw across multiple rails is better (required) for a PSU of that design.

    The freezing you get coming out of hibernation is normally not a CPU power issue, but if you were using multiple video cards and a low power PSU, then it might be. Check your BIOS for an option called Check Ready Bit, and enable it if it is disabled. Very little system detail was provided to analyze that problem.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    9

    Default Re: 8 pin and 4 pin cpu power connectors on MB

    Thanks Parsec. Mypower supply is an EVGA 1200 watt unit. I have the i7-5960X cpu, 32 GB of AData memory, a Samsung m.2 XP941 HDand two EVGA GTX 980 graphics cards in SLI. The MB is an ASRock x99 Professional boards. The cpu an gpus are water cooled. The bios does not have a Check Ready Bitoption under the ACPI section. However,disabling suspend to ram has stopped the feezing pc syndrome coming out of hibernation. Anything else I can do beyond this?

  4. #4
    parsec's Avatar
    parsec is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Third stone from the sun
    Posts
    4,824

    Default Re: 8 pin and 4 pin cpu power connectors on MB

    Your PSU is a high power unit and can easily power all your hardware. Your CPU is the top of the line Intel consumer processor (just saying not an enterprise model) and hardly needs an OC to accomplish things. Connecting both CPU power connectors won't hurt anything, but is not necessary.

    Interesting the Suspend to RAM set to disabled worked for you, since on many boards that is supposed to cause S1 sleep, which would keep the fans running, etc, in the PC. But if it works, great.

    If coming out of Hibernate now works right, I'm confused about anything else you would need to do. Usually there is nothing else to set besides the Check Ready Bit setting, which must (might?) be enabled by default.

    The freezing problem in the past was caused by Windows having a time threshold it expected all devices in the PC to be active within when waking from Sleep, etc. Some PSUs are slower to come on than others, as well as some hardware, so the Check Ready Bit setting is used to override the Windows time threshold, which IMO is set to low, under one second.

    To confirm, you are selecting Windows Hibernate, and not Sleep, is that right? Have you tried Sleep just to see what happens?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    9

    Default Re: 8 pin and 4 pin cpu power connectors on MB

    Hi Parsec,
    Sorry I should be more accurate about what I did. In addition to disabling suspend to ram in the bios I also executed the command powercfg.exe /hibernate off. The system now no longer goes into hibernation. That is how I "fixed" my issue. I guess I no longer create the hiberfil.sys file also. I read on some other websites that this was good for the lifetime of the SSD?

  6. #6
    parsec's Avatar
    parsec is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Third stone from the sun
    Posts
    4,824

    Default Re: 8 pin and 4 pin cpu power connectors on MB

    Windows Hibernate is a variation of Sleep, where the data needed to recreate the booted PC and desktop that is stored in DRAM memory, is also written to the OS/C: drive.

    When SSDs became available to the public, the limited life span of NAND memory became an issue with many PC tech writers and PC enthusiasts. Anything to reduce the amount of writing to a SSD was considered to be a good thing, such as stopping the creation of the hibernate file. Guides were written describing the ways to reduce writing to SSDs used as OS drives. The fear of SSDs wearing out and the ways to stop that became essential knowledge for SSD owners.

    In reality, the fear of wearing out SSDs was blown way, way out of proportion IMO. I've used SSDs for years, and applied many of the techniques to reduce writing to them, but I haven't done any of those things for quite a while now.

    Tests done by pros and amateurs have shown that SSD lifespan is at least over 100TB, most into the ~500TB range, and some up to and into multiple PetaBytes, 1,000TB = 1PB. I never worry about wearing out SSDs anymore, I treat them no differently than I would a HDD, except don't defragment them.

    It's interesting that while HDD/magnetic storage never specifies how many times the magnetic media can be written to, when NAND manufactures provided that spec, only then did we become worried about it. Ignorance is bliss.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •