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Thread: ASRock X99 and their intention to use the extra pins on Haswell-E's LGA




  1. #11
    parsec's Avatar
    parsec is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: ASRock X99 and their intention to use the extra pins on Haswell-E's LGA

    I don't have experience with any X99 boards, so I can't give you any advice in that area.

    You've basically selected the top X99 boards from each of the three or four main mobo manufactures, so any of them should be at least fine. But which is the best for over clocking is a hard call. I'd start searching for reviews of these boards and see what they have to say.

    Frankly the limiting factor in over clocking Intel processors lately is the processor itself, once you get to a certain level of mother board quality. Since Haswell processors were released, a new term related to over clocking has appeared, the "silicon lottery".

    That means people with identical mother boards find that one processor they purchased can OC to a certain level with X voltage, and another example of the same processor will OC to a different level (either less or more) with X voltage. Or they can OC to a higher speed with less voltage. Sadly the opposite of both of those things can happen.

    I've even seen this happen with the lowly Pentium Anniversary G3258 processor. The first one I bought can OC to 4.0GHz (standard speed is 3.2GHz) but needs almost 1.25V to do that and be stable. The second one I bought will OC perfectly to 4.4GHz with just under 1.20V. That of course is with the same mother board. I've seen posts in forums of these CPUs doing both better and worse than both of mine, on some pretty cheap boards.

    I would also suggest finding forums about over clocking Haswell-E processors, which will give you much more information about the topics you are interested in than I can.

    If you are not familiar with Haswell processor architecture, I would suggest you look into that too, since they have one significant characteristic that is different than any previous Intel processor.

  2. #12
    Britgeezer is offline Member
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    Default Re: ASRock X99 and their intention to use the extra pins on Haswell-E's LGA

    5 years is a long time in the PC world. It probably won't change your selection, but I doubt you will manage to keep the case covers on that long.

  3. #13
    parsec's Avatar
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    Default Re: ASRock X99 and their intention to use the extra pins on Haswell-E's LGA

    Quote Originally Posted by profJim View Post
    You're welcome, I just wish you weren't so pun-ney.

    I think that I see two groups with six unused pin locations in each group.

    Does this make me a pin-ney guy?
    I'd call you more of a pin-eyed guy. Hard to beat my first one... pun.

    If you haven't seen this, here is the Asus description of their super socket:

    ASRock X99 and their intention to use the extra pins on Haswell-E's LGA-asus-oc-socket-desc-jpg

    A couple interesting things here apparently, most important is that a Haswell-E processor has more contact lands than pins in the standard 2011-V3 CPU socket. Otherwise, what would the extra pins in the socket make contact with?

    Note in the picture of the "reference" socket, that its design seems to include a plastic "wall" in the area of the extra lands on the CPU. That looks like they are trying to isolate the extra lands on the CPU from any contact with socket pins.

    The implication of this IMO is the extra lands on the CPU and pins in the 2011-V3 CPU socket are used for power delivery and ground connections. But why would there be more contacts/lands on the processor than contact pins in the socket?

    Consider one of the Haswell-E Xeon processors that have 18 cores. While their rated TDP is the same as other Haswell-E processors, might they need more power to operate? That could account for the extra power related pins.

    Next is CPU core voltages of: CPU Core 0 Voltage 1.728v compared to CPU Core 0 Voltage 1.824v

    Those are some extreme voltages, certainly only for those using liquid nitrogen, since no processor could withstand those voltage levels for long unless cooled way below zero.

    OTOH, I hope Asus is not referring to the Haswell-E CPU Input Voltage in that description. That would be a Haswell-noob mistake that was common when mainstream Haswell processors were first released.

    Haswell processors have the VCore voltage regulators built into the processor itself. Only two voltages are supplied by a board to a Haswell processor, one of those is the CPU Input voltage.

    A typical Haswell CPU Input voltage is normally in the range of 1.60V to 1.80V. We clearly see that here with the voltages referenced in the socket description. But I assume that is a coincidence, and Asus is really referring to an extreme VCore voltage.

    Regardless, this is very interesting and deserves being looked into more...

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