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Thread: 80mm to 120mm cooler mount adapter to the CPU heatsink!




  1. #1
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    I was thinking, can I get more cooling performance if I put 120mm fan to the CPU heatsink using 80mm to 120mm fan mount adapter. Does the narrowing fan adapter cause so much whirlwinds, that you wonīt get any significant difference compared to the normal 80/92mm fan? :hammer:

    I also have another question. Letīs say that I have e.g. a 120mm fan which is rated to 1700rpm and I want to adjust the spinning speed (with some fan control thingy or something). Does the fan start to resonate if I adjust the rpm much lower than itīs rated speed? :?:

  2. #2
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    A reducer will generally cause a good deal of turbulence, especially when you want to reduce the airflow tube by a third.

    As to the resonating; I take it you're referring to a slight vibration caused bu the slower spinning fan blades? If so, then you should have no problems even when taking the voltage down to about 7v and sometimes even less. If you run into problems, it will likely be caused by either a poorly manufactured fan or possible an off-center label in the middle of the fan (yep... that pretty little sticker to tell you who made the fan).
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  3. #3
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    Would it be more efficient if I would put that 120mm fan about 5-10cm (depends how much there is space in the case) away from the heatsink (without the mount adapter of course). Would it cool the heatsink better than the 92mm fan which would be attached to the heatsink (or should I have a bigger heatsink if I wanna use that 120mm fan)? I was thinking to buy the Thermalright SLK-900-U heatsink. :hammer:

    BTW, which manufacturer makes the best fans? (Papst, Y.S. Tech maybe?) :?:

  4. #4
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    There are many good fan manufacturers out there now but I personally wouldn't go past usin' the 80mm to 92mm adaptor. As Darth pointed out, the 120mm is 1/3rd bigger than the 80mm is diameter but realistically it'd be tryin' to push twice as much volume thru the same aperture which'll mean a considerable back pressure which would not only hinder the fan but very likely impact on coolin' as well.

  5. #5
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    Thanks for clearing that fan adapter thingy to me, but you didnīt answer that fan placement question of mine. I now posted a picture that will clarify my question. So, which fan placement would be more effective, the left one or the right one (both fans are running at the same speed)? :confused: :cheers:

  6. #6
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    Personally I'd stick with the 92mm fan on the heatsink.

  7. #7
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    I used a 120mm Papst fan on the Thermaltake Volcano 11 heatsink by mounting it on an adapter. If you go for a 120mm fan, I strongly recommand that you use an 80mm to 120mm fan adapter. I got quite good results with that.

    There are two things about powerful fans and fan controllers you should consider: First, strong fans sometimes need up to 8 watt, so make sure the fan controller is able to provide enough power. Second, some fans need at least 7V or more to start working. If that's the case, never ever shut down the system with the fan controller being at the lowest level.
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zarathustra
    There are two things about powerful fans and fan controllers you should consider: First, strong fans sometimes need up to 8 watt, so make sure the fan controller is able to provide enough power. Second, some fans need at least 7V or more to start working. If that's the case, never ever shut down the system with the fan controller being at the lowest level.
    Do you mean that when I turn my system on and the fan controller wonīt give enough power the CPU fan wonīt start and in worst case I could fry my CPU?. :confused:

    You have now given me the opposite advices regarding that fan adapter. What CPU did you have and what kind of temps did you got with that system? Did you compared the temps you got with the 120mm fan and with the normal (80mm or 92mm) fan? :?:

  9. #9
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    Originally posted by Tomi_s
    Do you mean that when I turn my system on and the fan controller wonīt give enough power the CPU fan wonīt start and in worst case I could fry my CPU?. :confused:
    Exactly. Some good fan controllers will have the fans run with 12V for the first seconds, ignoring the actual settings, and then switch back to them.

    You have now given me the opposite advices regarding that fan adapter. What CPU did you have and what kind of temps did you got with that system? Did you compared the temps you got with the 120mm fan and with the normal (80mm or 92mm) fan? :?:
    Well, I can't give you "scientific" results. I compared the temperatures with the 80mm Thermaltake Volcano 11 fan, and got somewhat lower temperatures, 2 or 3 °C on average, maybe. However, the Volcano 11 fan is one of the strongest 80mm fans I've ever seen, so getting even better results is not so bad, I think. But the main advantage for me was the reduced noise. In general: same airflow but larger fan -> lower noise.

    Here are some pictures...









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  10. #10
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    At the risk of telling you what you already know Tomi_S:
    As long as you connect the RPM wire of a 3-pin 120mm fan to the A7N8X mobo you're running, Asus Probe (Or Motherboard Monitor) would set off an alarm, or shut down your machine if the fan wouldn't start. I like this method, as you can power the fan directly from the PSU with an adapter, or through a fanbus, and not draw power from the mobo. The risk of frying your CPU would be the same as with any other fan....pretty minimal, as long as there's still a HS attached. If you have the room in your case for the 120mm and adapter (I don't, as my CPU is a bit too close to the PSU) I don't see any problems with it....and a few advantages. Are you thinking of ducting straight from the case side to the HS with that 120mm?
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