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Thread: About overclocking and temperatures




  1. #1
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    Default About overclocking and temperatures

    How far would you say it's safe to push a Intel Core Duo E8400 a GA-EX38-DS4 mainboard with no extra cooling on the MCH + stock cpu cooler? Would 3.0-->3.4GHz be possible? ...planning on getting a better cpu cooler in the near future though.

    Thanx in advance.

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    Default Re: About overclocking and temperatures

    For SURE. Just watch your temps. Ya know, if you have your older 65-90nm Stock cooler you could do far better as it is larger and has a Copper core

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    Default Re: About overclocking and temperatures

    Sadly I never owned a 65nm cpu BUT I found an extra cooler for one at work. Gonna install it tomorrow when I am also installing a new HDD for Raid 0 + a new PSU. I was gonna order a better cpu cooler but our main suppliers of computer equipment at work was out of stock on the particular cpu cooler I wanted.

    Speedfan reports 37 degress idle
    Coretemp reports 42 degress idle

    It will be interesting to see how much better the Intel 65nm cpu cooler will perform.

    By the way when I already have a thread open, what does the letters after the multiplier mean in the memory multiplier section of the M.I.T? And what is the difference between them?
    Last edited by LaZ; 06-24-2008 at 03:25 AM. Reason: added a question

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    Default Re: About overclocking and temperatures

    Ya, it should help alot, it is twice as large and has the copper core

    They are FSB straps. Here is a well written explanation for that >>>

    Your north bridge has an internal clock speed and latencies just like your CPU and memory. The FSB of your north bridge can be found by dividing your original CPU multiplier by your set CPU multiplier and then multiplying by your FSB.

    So if you are running a E6600 (266 * 9) at 400Mhz x 8 your NB FSB is:

    (9 / 8) x 400 = 450Mhz FSB (1800Mhz Total)

    Just like your memory may be able to run at 4-4-4-12 at 1000Mhz but needs to run at 5-5-5-15 at 1200Mhz, your north bridge has a series of latencies which it must adjust in order to maintain stability at its FSB. These latencies seem to play a far more significant role in system performance than memory latencies.

    Intel has predefined specific latencies at specific NB FSB speeds. They are referred to as straps. There is a strap for when the NB FSB is 1066Mhz and under, 1333Mhz FSB and under, 1600Mhz FSB and under, ect. When you go from the 1066Mhz FSB strap to the 1333Mhz FSB strap, the north bridge's internal latencies loosen to allow for greater stability.

    ASUS has redefined the NB strap so that the 1333Mhz FSB strap does not come into effect until 401Mhz FSB (1604Mhz). Other perimeters of straps are someone unknown.

    Tony, the guy who pretty much figured all this out and he works for OCZ. He is now a lobbyist trying to get ASUS and other major motherboard manufacturers to give the end user the control of when straps start.

    There are 2 ways to beat the NB strap:

    1. Boot to windows in the 1066Mhz strap and then use Clockgen to increase your CPU's FSB. You can then get to a much higher FSB while maintaining the 1066Mhz strap simply because the BIOS does not adjust the north bridge's latencies in real time.
    2. Get a X6800 or QX6700 (or even a ES chip). To the north bridge, you are always at a default multiplier with a Extreme Edition processor. This allows you to set a much lower or higher multiplier without the NB FSB being effected.
    And here is some more reading, based of the 965 chipset, but will aslo give you some info
    Secrets of the i965 based Asus P5B and chipset strap uncovered. - The Tech Repository Forums

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    Default Re: About overclocking and temperatures

    Thanx for the great reading tips. I think I understand now but just to make sure, when overclocking it would be best to choose a higher strap i.e C or D as that would loosen the internal latencies?

    Example: For E8400 with PC6400 rams. 3.6GHz = 9x400fsb and memory multiplier 2.00C or 2.00D rather then 2.00A or 2.00B. Am I right?

    Oh and another thing; Is sata port0-3 Native mode supposed to be enabled or disabled when installing on a raid system?
    Last edited by LaZ; 06-24-2008 at 08:01 AM.

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    Default Re: About overclocking and temperatures

    Only testing each will let you know which is best for your hardware, looser may not be better

    Set to enabled, but really does not matter since your boot drive will be RAID anyway. But best enabled

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