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Thread: Stable E8400 OC - stock voltages




  1. #291
    Lsdmeasap's Avatar
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    Default Re: Stable E8400 OC - stock voltages

    Outside of the disk is the beginning = shortest distance to data

    Some reading on that for those who may be interested
    Radified Hard Drive Partitioning Strategies

  2. #292

    Default Re: Stable E8400 OC - stock voltages

    Quote Originally Posted by Lsdmeasap View Post
    Outside of the disk is the beginning = shortest distance to data

    Some reading on that for those who may be interested
    Radified Hard Drive Partitioning Strategies
    I used to put Windows on it's own partition. Maybe something worthwhile doing would be to move my current Win7 setup to another disk, partition the disk and then move Windows back to the first (C:) partition (just to get the job done without reinstalling) and install Windows apps on the second partition (D:) as I have not installed any apps yet. I used to do this all the time and stopped for simplicity and didn't know if I really gained that much by doing so anymore or not. Thought the info was dated but apparently not so?
    Last edited by SBMongoos; 11-28-2009 at 11:29 PM.
    Gigabyte EP45-UD3R (rev 1.1, bios F12), E8400 @ 3.83Ghz, Xigmatek S1283, 2x2Gb OCZ2RPR11504GK Reaper PC2-9500 HPC 1150Mhz, PNY 9600 GSO 768MB PCI-e OC , CoolerMaster 590, WinXP SP3 32bit and Win7 Pro 64 Bit (swappable HDD's via Icy Dock)


  3. #293
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    Default Re: Stable E8400 OC - stock voltages

    I have my disk set up exactly like you suggest, with the first 12GB used as Swap and if I need the highest speed for any odd job.



    The outside of the disk, as well as having the shortest head stroke is also an advantage because speaking scientifically, a disk spins faster at the outside edge. I'm not saying that on a 7200RPM the outside is spinning at 10000 or something. It's hard to explain.

    Think of it like this; Immagine the platter of a HDD. It's flat and circular. Imagine a line drawn from the centre to the outside edge (the radial line). along this like you draw one dot near the inside of the disk and another near the outside. Now imagine how long a line you would het if you were able to stretch out the circle formed by the rotation of this dot.

    Lets pretend that the drive platter spins at 10 RPM and the inside dot's rotational line stretches out to 1". Also imagine the outside edge dot's rotational path stretches out to 10". From this we can then say that in 1 second, if the heads are at the dot 1 position then 1" of platter goes through the heads per second. In the dot 2 position, 10" of platter goes past the head in 1 second.

    If more physical area passes through the head at the outside, then the outside is travelling faster than the inside. Speed = distance/time even with a disk. Don't you just love physics?

    It's less beneficial for an OS to be restricted to the 1st partition because of a few things. First the drive firmware will do its best to make sure the disk is filled from the outside in, meaning only the last bits of data to fill the drive will be at the slow end. Second, you have Boot Defrag, Prefetcher etc in XP, Vista and 7 which will move all the needed files at boot and all program files to the very outside edge of the disk.

    The reason a page file benefits is because the drive firmware over rides the logic of placing things at the edge when doing a lot of little random writes, as if it didn't 4K write performance would be even more horrible than it is now on HDD's. Performance would suffer immensely.
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  4. #294

    Default Re: Stable E8400 OC - stock voltages

    Quote Originally Posted by Psycho101 View Post
    I have my disk set up exactly like you suggest, with the first 12GB used as Swap and if I need the highest speed for any odd job.



    The outside of the disk, as well as having the shortest head stroke is also an advantage because speaking scientifically, a disk spins faster at the outside edge. I'm not saying that on a 7200RPM the outside is spinning at 10000 or something. It's hard to explain.

    Think of it like this; Immagine the platter of a HDD. It's flat and circular. Imagine a line drawn from the centre to the outside edge (the radial line). along this like you draw one dot near the inside of the disk and another near the outside. Now imagine how long a line you would het if you were able to stretch out the circle formed by the rotation of this dot.

    Lets pretend that the drive platter spins at 10 RPM and the inside dot's rotational line stretches out to 1". Also imagine the outside edge dot's rotational path stretches out to 10". From this we can then say that in 1 second, if the heads are at the dot 1 position then 1" of platter goes through the heads per second. In the dot 2 position, 10" of platter goes past the head in 1 second.

    If more physical area passes through the head at the outside, then the outside is travelling faster than the inside. Speed = distance/time even with a disk. Don't you just love physics?

    It's less beneficial for an OS to be restricted to the 1st partition because of a few things. First the drive firmware will do its best to make sure the disk is filled from the outside in, meaning only the last bits of data to fill the drive will be at the slow end. Second, you have Boot Defrag, Prefetcher etc in XP, Vista and 7 which will move all the needed files at boot and all program files to the very outside edge of the disk.

    The reason a page file benefits is because the drive firmware over rides the logic of placing things at the edge when doing a lot of little random writes, as if it didn't 4K write performance would be even more horrible than it is now on HDD's. Performance would suffer immensely.
    So are you using two disks. One with the Windows OS and apps (one partition) and a second drive that is partitioned with the swap file set at the first partition of the second drive?

    Sounds like it may not be that beneficial to have Windows on it's own partition from applications. I've been using Perfectdisk 10 for a while now as a defragmenter and plan to use it in Windows 7.
    Gigabyte EP45-UD3R (rev 1.1, bios F12), E8400 @ 3.83Ghz, Xigmatek S1283, 2x2Gb OCZ2RPR11504GK Reaper PC2-9500 HPC 1150Mhz, PNY 9600 GSO 768MB PCI-e OC , CoolerMaster 590, WinXP SP3 32bit and Win7 Pro 64 Bit (swappable HDD's via Icy Dock)


  5. #295

    Default Re: Stable E8400 OC - stock voltages

    Also, what really is the best allocation unit size to set a disk at? I know the default is about 4k. Is it any better to drop to 512?

    I haven't revisited this in years. Curious to where this currently stands.
    Gigabyte EP45-UD3R (rev 1.1, bios F12), E8400 @ 3.83Ghz, Xigmatek S1283, 2x2Gb OCZ2RPR11504GK Reaper PC2-9500 HPC 1150Mhz, PNY 9600 GSO 768MB PCI-e OC , CoolerMaster 590, WinXP SP3 32bit and Win7 Pro 64 Bit (swappable HDD's via Icy Dock)


  6. #296
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    Default Re: Stable E8400 OC - stock voltages

    Yep, I've got a SSD on SATA 0 for OS and progrms and a WD6400AAKS on sata 3 for data. the WD is partitioned into two, a 12GB for the swap with 5Gleft (a DVD's worth for on the fly ripping and encoding) and the remaining 584GB for data, downloads and backup images.

    IMO the best allocation size for a HDD partition or anythning else is the default 4K. Some programs don't like non standard cluster size. I also think that XP without any service packs will refuse to install to a non 4K cluster drive (fixed if using slipstreamed SP1).

    The benefits of different cluster sizes vary depending on if they're smaller or larger than default. Larger cluster sizes lead to better performance as if the files are quite large and spread over many clusters in random locations, the heads of the drive have to move less. Smaller clusters are more space efficient. If a file is written to a 64K cluster formatted drive that is 4K in size then the space that 4K file takes up on the disk is 64Kb rather than 4KB. This is because a cluster is the smallest increment of space an OS can use to store files.

    It has been suggested that for drives which are used heavily for sequential work or that are dedicated to a page file, larger cluster sizes are better. IMO, 4K is fine and you'll note very very little difference.

    On the Corsair SSD forum there's actually a guide for setting up SSD RAID that states out of all combinations a stripe of 128K combined with 64K clusters is the best performer. However with thousands of small files on an OS partition it's wasteful. I've experimented a lot with cluster size on a WD2000JS RAID 0 array (2 drives) but after a while, and the first re-install, couldn't be arsed to use the 32K clusters again as it made no noticeable difference.

    Feel free to try new things, don't let me put you off though. Just that for me, 4K was fine, and I like squeezing every drop of performance I can. Cluster size was like trying to squeeze performance out of a stone.


    Lsd: The quietest drives I have heard so far that are native IDE have been Seagate's specialist range. The smaller capacities are noted for being about half the usual height while maintaining the 3.5" form factor. First gen used 160GB platters and the second gen uses 320GB platters with both being single drives.

    Perhaps a better way to go would be to see if you can find a large IDE drive that supports AAM Acoustic management and runs 5400RPM. That way you can hook it up to your PC as a spare, set the quietest AAM setting and tweak the power management to match the old drive. Not sure if there are many IDE AAM enabled drives on the market though. AAM does make a big difference to the sound. A HDD that sounds like a tin of angry bees is almost silent with AAM on full.
    Coolermaster CM 690 II advance Case
    Corsair HX750 (CWT, 91%(80+ Gold rated @230V) single 62A 12V rail
    P55A-UD4 v2.0 @ F14
    Core i5 760 @ 20 x 201, 4.02GHz
    TRUE Black with a single Noctua NF-P12 pumping out 55 CFM @ 19db .
    2 x 2GB Mushkin Ridgeback (996902), @ 7-10-8-27, 2010-DDR, 1.66v
    2 x Gigabyte GTX 460 1024MB in SLI (Pre OC'd to 715MHz core and 1800MHz VRAM) @ 850 Core / 4100 Mem.
    Intel X25-M Boot Drive (OS and Programs) 200MB/s Read & 90MB/s Write
    Corsair X32 200MB/s Read & 100MB/s Write
    WD Caviar Blue 640GB C (Steam, Games, Storage, Temp Files & Folders, etc)
    Samsung F3 500GB Backup/Images
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  7. #297

    Default Re: Stable E8400 OC - stock voltages

    Quote Originally Posted by Psycho101 View Post
    Yep, I've got a SSD on SATA 0 for OS and progrms and a WD6400AAKS on sata 3 for data. the WD is partitioned into two, a 12GB for the swap with 5Gleft (a DVD's worth for on the fly ripping and encoding) and the remaining 584GB for data, downloads and backup images.
    Do you have Windows on one partition and your applications on another on the SSD?
    Gigabyte EP45-UD3R (rev 1.1, bios F12), E8400 @ 3.83Ghz, Xigmatek S1283, 2x2Gb OCZ2RPR11504GK Reaper PC2-9500 HPC 1150Mhz, PNY 9600 GSO 768MB PCI-e OC , CoolerMaster 590, WinXP SP3 32bit and Win7 Pro 64 Bit (swappable HDD's via Icy Dock)


  8. #298
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    Default Re: Stable E8400 OC - stock voltages

    Nope, just the normal System Reserved partition created by Windows 7 and the rest is a single partition for OS and programs.

    Some swear by partitioning HDD's and go partition nuts. This is utterly pointless. Microsoft invented folders for the organisation of data, not a million partitions.

    I'd partition for two reasons on an OS drive, One to force the swap to the front of the disk and the second if the user formats and re-installs a heck of a lot with only one physical drive. Then I'd give em one partition for OS and apps and another for data.

    A SSD is completely uniform in speed over the entire capacity, so on that kind of medium, partitions offer zero performance benefit. LBA locations on a SSD don't necessarily marry with actual physical position of the sector on a SSD either due to wear levelling algorithms used by the SSD controller, that are hidden from the OS to fool it into not being "upset" by such remapping actions.
    Coolermaster CM 690 II advance Case
    Corsair HX750 (CWT, 91%(80+ Gold rated @230V) single 62A 12V rail
    P55A-UD4 v2.0 @ F14
    Core i5 760 @ 20 x 201, 4.02GHz
    TRUE Black with a single Noctua NF-P12 pumping out 55 CFM @ 19db .
    2 x 2GB Mushkin Ridgeback (996902), @ 7-10-8-27, 2010-DDR, 1.66v
    2 x Gigabyte GTX 460 1024MB in SLI (Pre OC'd to 715MHz core and 1800MHz VRAM) @ 850 Core / 4100 Mem.
    Intel X25-M Boot Drive (OS and Programs) 200MB/s Read & 90MB/s Write
    Corsair X32 200MB/s Read & 100MB/s Write
    WD Caviar Blue 640GB C (Steam, Games, Storage, Temp Files & Folders, etc)
    Samsung F3 500GB Backup/Images
    Noctua 1300RPM 19dB case fan (rear extraction)
    3 x 140 MM Coolermaster LED fans (one front intake, one top extraction, one side intake)
    Dell Ultra Sharp 2209WAf E-IPS @ 1680x1050

  9. #299

    Default Re: Stable E8400 OC - stock voltages

    Thanks for the info. Good stuff!

    Curious about some settings in the BIOS. I currently have the following set to suit XP 32 bit. But I'm swapping disks in an Icy Dock if I want to run Win 7 (part of my migration process to Win 7 Pro 64bit - to load what I want/need). I'm wondering if I did this wrong as I may not be able to change the following settings after the fact for Win 7 64bit (vs XP 32bit).

    Option in bold is my setting.

    • SATA RAID/AHCI MODE
      • Disabled

      • RAID

      • AHCI Mode
    • SATA PORT 0-3 NATIVE MODE
      • Enabled

      • Disabled
    • ONBOARD SATA/IDE CONTROL MODE
      • IDE

      • AHCI

      • RAID IDE


    Under Power Settings

    • HPET Support
      • Enabled

      • Disabled
    • HPET Mode <- Greyed out if HPET Support Disabled
      • 32 Bit

      • 64 Bit


    Lastly, how do you guys have the following settings while OC'ing:

    • CPU Warning Temp
      • Disabled

      • 60C/140F

      • 70C/158F

      • 80C/176F

      • 90C/194F
    • CPU Fan Fail Warning
      • Enabled

      • Disabled
    • System Fan2 Fail Warning
      • Enabled

      • Disabled
    • Power Fan Fail Warning
      • Enabled

      • Disabled
    • System Fan 1 Fail Warning
      • Enabled

      • Disabled
    • CPU Smart Fan Control
      • Auto

      • Disabled
    • CPU Smart Fan Mode
      • Auto

      • Disabled
    Gigabyte EP45-UD3R (rev 1.1, bios F12), E8400 @ 3.83Ghz, Xigmatek S1283, 2x2Gb OCZ2RPR11504GK Reaper PC2-9500 HPC 1150Mhz, PNY 9600 GSO 768MB PCI-e OC , CoolerMaster 590, WinXP SP3 32bit and Win7 Pro 64 Bit (swappable HDD's via Icy Dock)


  10. #300
    Lsdmeasap's Avatar
    Lsdmeasap is offline GIGABYTE Guru
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    Default Re: Stable E8400 OC - stock voltages

    Quote Originally Posted by Psycho101 View Post
    Lsd: The quietest drives I have heard so far that are native IDE have been Seagate's specialist range. The smaller capacities are noted for being about half the usual height while maintaining the 3.5" form factor. First gen used 160GB platters and the second gen uses 320GB platters with both being single drives.

    Perhaps a better way to go would be to see if you can find a large IDE drive that supports AAM Acoustic management and runs 5400RPM. That way you can hook it up to your PC as a spare, set the quietest AAM setting and tweak the power management to match the old drive. Not sure if there are many IDE AAM enabled drives on the market though. AAM does make a big difference to the sound. A HDD that sounds like a tin of angry bees is almost silent with AAM on full.
    Which 160GB drives do you see that are good, I mean still for sale new?

    I would be connecting it to my PC for sure anyway to do the mirroring process, so I would check into that as well but it's hard to know from specs which allow this to be changed. I know the OEM ones do not, well most of them I have looked at for Dell client's anyway.

    Quote Originally Posted by SBMongoos View Post
    Thanks for the info. Good stuff!

    Curious about some settings in the BIOS. I currently have the following set to suit XP 32 bit. But I'm swapping disks in an Icy Dock if I want to run Win 7 (part of my migration process to Win 7 Pro 64bit - to load what I want/need). I'm wondering if I did this wrong as I may not be able to change the following settings after the fact for Win 7 64bit (vs XP 32bit).

    Option in bold is my setting.

    • SATA RAID/AHCI MODE
      • Disabled


      • RAID


      • AHCI Mode

    • SATA PORT 0-3 NATIVE MODE
      • Enabled


      • Disabled

    • ONBOARD SATA/IDE CONTROL MODE
      • IDE


      • AHCI


      • RAID IDE



    Under Power Settings

    • HPET Support
      • Enabled


      • Disabled

    • HPET Mode <- Greyed out if HPET Support Disabled
      • 32 Bit


      • 64 Bit



    Lastly, how do you guys have the following settings while OC'ing:

    • CPU Warning Temp
      • Disabled


      • 60C/140F


      • 70C/158F


      • 80C/176F


      • 90C/194F

    • CPU Fan Fail Warning
      • Enabled


      • Disabled

    • System Fan2 Fail Warning
      • Enabled


      • Disabled

    • Power Fan Fail Warning
      • Enabled


      • Disabled

    • System Fan 1 Fail Warning
      • Enabled


      • Disabled

    • CPU Smart Fan Control
      • Auto


      • Disabled

    • CPU Smart Fan Mode
      • Auto


      • Disabled


    You can enabled HPET and set to your OS type, this can be changed anytime you like and will have no ill effects.

    Fans and warnings, all disabled here but I am on water. Not sure what would be best for air cooling but I do know the CPU Fan mode you want to set will depend on your fan and how you want things to sound.

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