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Thread: Teaming and Bridging...?




  1. #1

    Default Teaming and Bridging...?

    Could someone explain to me the difference between Teaming and Bridging? I ask because if they are essentially the same, then it wouldn't make sense to use the Realtek Teaming software to do it when the OS software can do it with one less layer of code... right?
    Quote Originally Posted by Alex St. John
    Consider for a moment that what we think of as “intelligence” is the byproduct of a computing architecture that depends on massive parallelism to interact with the world in real time without stalling for progress bars. If our ancestors’ brains had depended on running Vista on current dual-core processors for their survival, they would have been eaten by bears.

    Best Quote Ever...
    Quote Originally Posted by Psycho101
    Obey the one and only rule without question when you overclock.... don't cause a fire. Fires are hot and burny... not good.
    Intel E8400 EO@445x9--Gigabyte EP45-UD3P v1.1 ~ F9--EVGA 9800GT @ 700/1750/1100--8GB Gskill 1066

  2. #2

    Default Re: Teaming and Bridging...?

    Anyone...? Oops, I should have posted this in the Internet and Networking Forum, sorry. Would a mod like to move this post?
    Quote Originally Posted by Alex St. John
    Consider for a moment that what we think of as “intelligence” is the byproduct of a computing architecture that depends on massive parallelism to interact with the world in real time without stalling for progress bars. If our ancestors’ brains had depended on running Vista on current dual-core processors for their survival, they would have been eaten by bears.

    Best Quote Ever...
    Quote Originally Posted by Psycho101
    Obey the one and only rule without question when you overclock.... don't cause a fire. Fires are hot and burny... not good.
    Intel E8400 EO@445x9--Gigabyte EP45-UD3P v1.1 ~ F9--EVGA 9800GT @ 700/1750/1100--8GB Gskill 1066

  3. #3

    Default Re: Teaming and Bridging...?

    AFAIK the Teaming is used when connected to a single network to either increases the bandwidth or to introduce redundancy. Bridging allows each NIC device to be connected to different network and provides routing (NAT) function to allow traffic between the networks. Never played with it though.
    Last edited by gampamu; 07-16-2009 at 07:18 AM. Reason: grammer
    QX9650 batch L739A761/ GA-EP45-UD3P/ Kingston KHX9200 4x1G

  4. #4
    Lsdmeasap's Avatar
    Lsdmeasap is offline GIGABYTE Guru
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  5. #5

    Default Re: Teaming and Bridging...?

    I was under the impression that Bridging simply consolidated multiple LAN ports, whether they are hooked up to different connections, or simply to a Router... which sounds like Teaming to me. I ask because this machine gets the job of housing media for our laptop and other desktop. I thought that by Teaming the LAN I would be able to do that without losing bandwidth online.

    Oh, and I mentioned moving it because I thought it would be more proper in the Network Forum.... whatever you think is best Lsd.
    Quote Originally Posted by Alex St. John
    Consider for a moment that what we think of as “intelligence” is the byproduct of a computing architecture that depends on massive parallelism to interact with the world in real time without stalling for progress bars. If our ancestors’ brains had depended on running Vista on current dual-core processors for their survival, they would have been eaten by bears.

    Best Quote Ever...
    Quote Originally Posted by Psycho101
    Obey the one and only rule without question when you overclock.... don't cause a fire. Fires are hot and burny... not good.
    Intel E8400 EO@445x9--Gigabyte EP45-UD3P v1.1 ~ F9--EVGA 9800GT @ 700/1750/1100--8GB Gskill 1066

  6. #6
    Chike is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: Teaming and Bridging...?

    Quote Originally Posted by grishkafool View Post
    I ask because this machine gets the job of housing media for our laptop and other desktop. I thought that by Teaming the LAN I would be able to do that without losing bandwidth online.
    This perheps be done with differemt IP to each of the NICs and a routing table that routs LAN traffic to one port and WAN traffic to the other.
    But only if you have high LAN traffic you will need this.

  7. #7
    Lsdmeasap's Avatar
    Lsdmeasap is offline GIGABYTE Guru
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    Default Re: Teaming and Bridging...?

    Yes, you must have two IP's and your router/access point must also support the features.

    I was going to copy this thread over there for you, but it can only be moved and not copied. So let me know if you would like it moved and I will do so.

  8. #8

    Default Re: Teaming and Bridging...?

    Go ahead and move it Lsdmeasap, there might be more people than me interested in this tidbit.

    One Fact, I only have the two onboard LAN ports, atm. I wasn't planning on installing a NIC card.

    So, I am understanding that it would be helpful to Team my LAN ports, then? Doing so would allow me to stream music and serve photos and movies to the other desktop while keeping plenty of bandwidth available for downloads and light gaming? As I understand it, Teaming would give me twice the bandwidth to the network, right?
    Quote Originally Posted by Alex St. John
    Consider for a moment that what we think of as “intelligence” is the byproduct of a computing architecture that depends on massive parallelism to interact with the world in real time without stalling for progress bars. If our ancestors’ brains had depended on running Vista on current dual-core processors for their survival, they would have been eaten by bears.

    Best Quote Ever...
    Quote Originally Posted by Psycho101
    Obey the one and only rule without question when you overclock.... don't cause a fire. Fires are hot and burny... not good.
    Intel E8400 EO@445x9--Gigabyte EP45-UD3P v1.1 ~ F9--EVGA 9800GT @ 700/1750/1100--8GB Gskill 1066

  9. #9

    Default Re: Teaming and Bridging...?

    Quote Originally Posted by gampamu View Post
    Bridging allows each NIC device to be connected to different network and provides routing (NAT) function to allow traffic between the networks. Never played with it though.
    Not quite.

    A Bridge merges two networks. The original use was probably to adapt different physical networks together. For example a hub where you can connect both Cat5 twisted pair cables and a coaxial cable is a bridge. [Edit] (On second thought not a real bridge for both sides are Ethernet.)

    Devices on both side of the bridge belong to the same logical LAN. Thus, there is no routing nor NAT in use.

    I have used bridge on Linux desktop when there is only one Cat5e wall outlet in the room. Server room has switch and DHCP and router. You connect computer to the outlet and it gets IP address and everything just "works". Now you want to connect a Laptop too. But no free port on the wall, no extra switch/hub at hand, and no wireless. Make the Desktop a bridge. Connect the Laptop into the second NIC of the Desktop. To Laptop (and server) it looks like it has been connected directly to the wall.

    The Bridge can be invisible. It does not need even an IP address. But it can have one for the logical interface. Bridge can have multiple physical interfaces "enslaved" to it.

    Linux can filter traffic that crosses the bridge. You can make a firewall with it. To other machines on the network it will look like a damn poor patch cable, losing so many packets and all. ;)

    Recent trick is to create a virtual bridge in the host of virtual machine guests. The guests do not see the host and think that they are directly connected to the physical LAN.


    Routing is something different (and much more common). Router is between two different LANs. Router has to translate addresses (NAT). When a PC in LAN want to connect to "outside", it passes the packet to the router (aka gateway), and the gateway replaces the "From" field with its own address on the other network. That way the responses will be addressed to the router. Once the reply arrives, router replaces the "To" field of the reply with the address of the PC in the LAN and passes it onward.

    ADSL modems can be either routers or just bridges. When they are bridges, they do not contain DHCP, but just pass packets from computer to DHCP of the ISP. They bridge between Ethernet and xDSL.


    Teaming, aka bonding, is indeed for adding bandwidth or redundancy. Again, you will have one logical connection between two network devices, but more than one cable. The traffic can be spread over all cables to get more throughput, or only one line is used and other is in reserve, should the used one break down. Both ends of the connection have to support the same mode of teaming, and there are multiple modes to choose from.
    Last edited by mv2devnull; 07-18-2009 at 10:02 PM.

  10. #10

    Default Re: Teaming and Bridging...?

    Thank you for the clarification.
    QX9650 batch L739A761/ GA-EP45-UD3P/ Kingston KHX9200 4x1G

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