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Thread: Auto vs. Normal settings in BIOS




  1. #1

    Default Auto vs. Normal settings in BIOS

    I have tried to search this here at Tweak and not found any on point topics.

    Could someone please explain the Functional Difference between Auto and Normal when it comes to BIOS settings?
    Quote Originally Posted by Alex St. John
    Consider for a moment that what we think of as “intelligence” is the byproduct of a computing architecture that depends on massive parallelism to interact with the world in real time without stalling for progress bars. If our ancestors’ brains had depended on running Vista on current dual-core processors for their survival, they would have been eaten by bears.

    Best Quote Ever...
    Quote Originally Posted by Psycho101
    Obey the one and only rule without question when you overclock.... don't cause a fire. Fires are hot and burny... not good.
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  2. #2
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    Default Re: Auto vs. Normal settings in BIOS

    In the case of a voltage where no scaling is involved, Normal will keep the voltage at a constant stock level. Eg if you set normal for a CPU with a VID of 1.25V, then no matter what you do to FSB etc, it will remain at 1.25V.

    I'm uncertain of how this effects scaling voltages such as reference volts which is why I avoid putting them (or anything actually) on normal. It may well be that because "normal" behaviour for a reference is to scale with its linked voltage, Normal will let it do this. It may also mean that Normal stops it scalin propperly.

    To test this, put CPU and/or MCH ref on normal, and change VTT. Look at the values in ET6. If the references aren't allowed to scale, then each VTT level would mean a different % of VTT, so 0.760 will only be shown in ET6 for 1.2VTT. If with refs on normal they show 0.760 regardless of VTT value it's safe to say that Normal works the same as Auto for references.

    In either case, it sounds like Normal isn't the best thing to use. Just my opinion.
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  3. #3

    Default Re: Auto vs. Normal settings in BIOS

    Quote Originally Posted by Psycho101 View Post
    In the case of a voltage where no scaling is involved, Normal will keep the voltage at a constant stock level. Eg if you set normal for a CPU with a VID of 1.25V, then no matter what you do to FSB etc, it will remain at 1.25V.

    I'm uncertain of how this effects scaling voltages such as reference volts which is why I avoid putting them (or anything actually) on normal. It may well be that because "normal" behaviour for a reference is to scale with its linked voltage, Normal will let it do this. It may also mean that Normal stops it scalin propperly.

    To test this, put CPU and/or MCH ref on normal, and change VTT. Look at the values in ET6. If the references aren't allowed to scale, then each VTT level would mean a different % of VTT, so 0.760 will only be shown in ET6 for 1.2VTT. If with refs on normal they show 0.760 regardless of VTT value it's safe to say that Normal works the same as Auto for references.

    In either case, it sounds like Normal isn't the best thing to use. Just my opinion.
    Thanks Psycho, that is kind of what I suspected, but needed a simple clear explanation of it.

    A buddy of mine has a q9650 and he is ends up having to use Normal settings to find stability over 3.8GHz.. I asked him what it does and he wasn't sure. Now I have an inkling.
    Quote Originally Posted by Alex St. John
    Consider for a moment that what we think of as “intelligence” is the byproduct of a computing architecture that depends on massive parallelism to interact with the world in real time without stalling for progress bars. If our ancestors’ brains had depended on running Vista on current dual-core processors for their survival, they would have been eaten by bears.

    Best Quote Ever...
    Quote Originally Posted by Psycho101
    Obey the one and only rule without question when you overclock.... don't cause a fire. Fires are hot and burny... not good.
    Intel E8400 EO@445x9--Gigabyte EP45-UD3P v1.1 ~ F9--EVGA 9800GT @ 700/1750/1100--8GB Gskill 1066

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Auto vs. Normal settings in BIOS

    I know I read somewhere where lsdmeasap was explaining to someone the diffrence between them. But I see where psycho101 has answered your queston. G/L

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    Default Re: Auto vs. Normal settings in BIOS

    Always put as little in the bios programmers hands and set and change the voltages yourself and you'll always be better off in the end.
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  6. #6

    Default Re: Auto vs. Normal settings in BIOS

    Quote Originally Posted by DankBuddha View Post
    Always put as little in the bios programmers hands and set and change the voltages yourself and you'll always be better off in the end.
    I tend to set most every value manually... I was just curious what the Functional difference was between Normal and Auto. As a side note, I am curious why they would include a Normal setting if it locks the value at VID levels.
    Quote Originally Posted by Alex St. John
    Consider for a moment that what we think of as “intelligence” is the byproduct of a computing architecture that depends on massive parallelism to interact with the world in real time without stalling for progress bars. If our ancestors’ brains had depended on running Vista on current dual-core processors for their survival, they would have been eaten by bears.

    Best Quote Ever...
    Quote Originally Posted by Psycho101
    Obey the one and only rule without question when you overclock.... don't cause a fire. Fires are hot and burny... not good.
    Intel E8400 EO@445x9--Gigabyte EP45-UD3P v1.1 ~ F9--EVGA 9800GT @ 700/1750/1100--8GB Gskill 1066

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Auto vs. Normal settings in BIOS

    Normal , unlike auto for Vcore will allow EIST to lower core voltage. A normal setting is advantagious in that it will not let Vcore be changed above VID levels, unlike auto, where it will scale with what ever the board thinks (and it's not good at thinking, which is why you should set manual settings really).

    The only use for a normal Vcore I can see is where not overclocking at all or lightly overclocking with something like CIA2 (which I'd never recommend). You can then guarantee that vcore won't rise to silly levels when dynamically overclocked.
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    TRUE Black with a single Noctua NF-P12 pumping out 55 CFM @ 19db .
    2 x 2GB Mushkin Ridgeback (996902), @ 7-10-8-27, 2010-DDR, 1.66v
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