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Thread: Front Power Switch




  1. #1
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    Default Front Power Switch

    When I press the power switch on the front of my case, it is only closed for the amount of that I hold it down. So starting the computer is just briefly touching the contacts together. Do motherboards expect the switch to stay closed during system operation?
    Gigabyte EP45-DS3R | E8500 3.16Ghz | 4GB Corsair XMS 1066 | Sapphire HD4850 675/993 | 2x Hitachi 250GB RAID 0 | Bios F11e | Cooler Master CM690

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Front Power Switch

    No it is only meant to be a momentary switch. Your motherboard will have a loop in it to keep the power going once the initial moment you hit the switch
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  3. #3
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    Default Re: Front Power Switch

    Quote Originally Posted by yoshi68 View Post
    No it is only meant to be a momentary switch. Your motherboard will have a loop in it to keep the power going once the initial moment you hit the switch
    Indeed. I agree.

    It used to be the case that a PC had a push and click power button that would stay in when the rig was on and you'd push again to instantly cut the power.

    the last PC I had that had that kind of switch was a Pentium 166 on a TX motherboard.All modern PC's can be powered off by software as well as by the power switch. for this to happen the power button needs to be how it is now. If it were not then software wouldn't be able to power anything down. The power button in a modern PC now simply sends a signal to the PSU to start up, which in turn starts up the rest of the rig. This is why there is always power flowing on the +5VSB (5 volt Stand By) PSU rail.
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  4. #4
    MadMax2911's Avatar
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    Default Re: Front Power Switch

    Quote Originally Posted by jrazor247 View Post
    When I press the power switch on the front of my case, it is only closed for the amount of that I hold it down. So starting the computer is just briefly touching the contacts together. Do motherboards expect the switch to stay closed during system operation?
    I learned another neat trick when Overclocking sometimes the system will become unbootable and need the BIOS settings cleared. The fastest way to do this is to use the reset SW on the case and reroute it to the Clear BIOS or Clear CMOS pins on the MOBO. It saves time when you have to reset and then take parts out to get down to Clear CMOS pins.
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  5. #5
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    Default Re: Front Power Switch

    Yes, that's a good tip. I have my reset switch hooked up like that too.

    If I have AHCI enabled then for some reason my USB keyboard (yes I do have USB KB enabled in BIOS) will not register me pressing the delete key to enter setup. It would register [F12] boot menu just fine, so no issue with DOS/non Windows KB settings. When I needed to enter the BIOS I had to use the reset to cear CMOS, and IDE mode would be active rather than AHCI, thus allowing me to get into the BIOS.

    Seems that the POST process moves on so quick with AHCI on that the USB KB or even the whole USB controller hasn't initialised yet.

    The fix for me was to enter a 5 second Hard Drive Delay in the BIOS options. Now the KB is initialised before the first POST screen finishes and I can enter the BIOS in AHCI mode.
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  6. #6
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    Default Re: Front Power Switch

    Yes, what you all said makes sense. I think I will use the PSU switch as on off, setting BIOS powers on setting accordingly. Use the case power switch for reset, and the reset switch for clear CMOS. If I wasn't having issues, I would just leave it on all the time. Thanks
    Gigabyte EP45-DS3R | E8500 3.16Ghz | 4GB Corsair XMS 1066 | Sapphire HD4850 675/993 | 2x Hitachi 250GB RAID 0 | Bios F11e | Cooler Master CM690

  7. #7
    Chike is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: Front Power Switch

    Using the PSU switch BIOS settings will be probably lost after long shutdown.
    The switch used to rest CMOS is the reset switch not the power.

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    Default Re: Front Power Switch

    Quote Originally Posted by jrazor247 View Post
    Yes, what you all said makes sense. I think I will use the PSU switch as on off, setting BIOS powers on setting accordingly. Use the case power switch for reset, and the reset switch for clear CMOS. If I wasn't having issues, I would just leave it on all the time. Thanks
    That's not going to work. You need the power button connected to the power pins on the motherboard.

    What issues are you having that you'd need to set it up in such a strange way?

    If you want zero power going through the PC when not in use, you can simply use the PSU switch for that purpose after powering off propperly. If you're shutting down the OS first, it will automatically power down the PC anyway.
    Coolermaster CM 690 II advance Case
    Corsair HX750 (CWT, 91%(80+ Gold rated @230V) single 62A 12V rail
    P55A-UD4 v2.0 @ F14
    Core i5 760 @ 20 x 201, 4.02GHz
    TRUE Black with a single Noctua NF-P12 pumping out 55 CFM @ 19db .
    2 x 2GB Mushkin Ridgeback (996902), @ 7-10-8-27, 2010-DDR, 1.66v
    2 x Gigabyte GTX 460 1024MB in SLI (Pre OC'd to 715MHz core and 1800MHz VRAM) @ 850 Core / 4100 Mem.
    Intel X25-M Boot Drive (OS and Programs) 200MB/s Read & 90MB/s Write
    Corsair X32 200MB/s Read & 100MB/s Write
    WD Caviar Blue 640GB C (Steam, Games, Storage, Temp Files & Folders, etc)
    Samsung F3 500GB Backup/Images
    Noctua 1300RPM 19dB case fan (rear extraction)
    3 x 140 MM Coolermaster LED fans (one front intake, one top extraction, one side intake)
    Dell Ultra Sharp 2209WAf E-IPS @ 1680x1050

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Front Power Switch

    I was having very poor graphics issues. Investigating, I found my system only pulling 220 watts while playing crysis. Investigating further, the BIOS voltage dips to 2.7 volts, and then up to 4 volts. BIOS no longer auto-detects CPU and memory settings properly. I probably won't set up the switches as I mentioned, it was just an idea.

    Flashing BIOS F11C, a text screen after post claimed to have flashed HDD and backup bios. It seemed strange, none of the past versions did so, and F11D and F11E did not either.
    Gigabyte EP45-DS3R | E8500 3.16Ghz | 4GB Corsair XMS 1066 | Sapphire HD4850 675/993 | 2x Hitachi 250GB RAID 0 | Bios F11e | Cooler Master CM690

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Front Power Switch

    Your problem definitely isn't switch related. To completely rule it out, use the reset button as the power switch and see if it makes any difference.

    As for your BIOS issues, do acomplete CMOS clear. Find a jumper from an old HDD/DVD ROM/CD drive and place it over the clear CMOS pins. Remove the battery and wait for a hour. Then put the battery back in and remove the jumper. Go to the BIOS and load optimized defaults, save and exit. Even a full BIOS flash sometimes doesn't clear everything.

    How are you measuring power consumption? If it's using software then it's not accurate. If you're using a plug in watt meter then they are more accurate but not exact.

    Which voltage are you refering to when you say dips to 2.4V then up to 4V? Is that the 3.3V rail or the 5V rail? If either then again, how are you measuring the voltage? The only reliable way is with a DMM. Even PC Health readings are only approximate. I've found them to be +/-0.06V on CPU, VDIMM etc and sometimes more than 0.2V out on PSU Rails.
    Coolermaster CM 690 II advance Case
    Corsair HX750 (CWT, 91%(80+ Gold rated @230V) single 62A 12V rail
    P55A-UD4 v2.0 @ F14
    Core i5 760 @ 20 x 201, 4.02GHz
    TRUE Black with a single Noctua NF-P12 pumping out 55 CFM @ 19db .
    2 x 2GB Mushkin Ridgeback (996902), @ 7-10-8-27, 2010-DDR, 1.66v
    2 x Gigabyte GTX 460 1024MB in SLI (Pre OC'd to 715MHz core and 1800MHz VRAM) @ 850 Core / 4100 Mem.
    Intel X25-M Boot Drive (OS and Programs) 200MB/s Read & 90MB/s Write
    Corsair X32 200MB/s Read & 100MB/s Write
    WD Caviar Blue 640GB C (Steam, Games, Storage, Temp Files & Folders, etc)
    Samsung F3 500GB Backup/Images
    Noctua 1300RPM 19dB case fan (rear extraction)
    3 x 140 MM Coolermaster LED fans (one front intake, one top extraction, one side intake)
    Dell Ultra Sharp 2209WAf E-IPS @ 1680x1050

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