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Thread: Intel Management Engine Interface, is it needed?




  1. #11
    boondocks's Avatar
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    Default Re: Intel Management Engine Interface, is it needed?

    There's some examples in profJim's post. If you don't understand what it says, that's on you.
    I guess you're trying to make an argument out of it.....but I'm done with it.
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  2. #12
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    Default Re: Intel Management Engine Interface, is it needed?

    No, those are not examples of any kind, it's more like that bull**** people from recruitment agencies say - tons of words with no meaning whatsoever :D
    I have yet to see any real world example of what that thing actually does. I even tried to google for it for quite some time and got exactly zero results.

  3. #13
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    Default Re: Intel Management Engine Interface, is it needed?

    Quote Originally Posted by Octopuss View Post
    No, those are not examples of any kind, it's more like that bull**** people from recruitment agencies say - tons of words with no meaning whatsoever :D
    I have yet to see any real world example of what that thing actually does. I even tried to google for it for quite some time and got exactly zero results.
    The functionality is pretty clear if you do enough research. It's mainly for remote management of machines, for example you can boot up a turned off machine and even modify the bios remotely (teamviewer for bios :P). You can also set up many policies for this machine.. Basically It's a great idea for businesses and so, not for home users.

    Check these videos out:
    What makes Intel AMT motherboards special? - YouTube
    Intel AMT Commander demonstration (1/2) - YouTube
    Intel AMT Commander demonstration (2/2) - YouTube

    My main point was that some of the articles discussing IMEI mentioned that the chip itself is responsible for many functions in the system, making it sound like a core component, without explaining those 'many functions'. (I think it's related to overclocking from inside the windows environment too, but thats something I don't do)

    Anyway, I never installed the windows driver and I'm not planning to. I wonder why the chip does not have any options in bios, we should be able to disable it.

  4. #14
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    Default Re: Intel Management Engine Interface, is it needed?

    I once tried to do something-anything with this. I figured ok, this is supposed to let me do some sort of remote access/management with any PC that has such chip on the board. I thought I'd install driver for the ME engine something, and some software that would do the remote management on other PC. I was very surprised I couldn't find ANYTHING. I looked through Intel's web and there was nothing that looked like it could do this.
    The whole thing is still a mystery to me.

  5. #15
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    Default Re: Intel Management Engine Interface, is it needed?

    I look at it mostly as an interface between the BIOS and the OS.
    But the way things are going these days, it wouldn't surprise me if someone found out it's also a backdoor for the NSA.
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    Default Re: Intel Management Engine Interface, is it needed?

    What confuses me even more is the "full" package that contains the driver. It has ton of files, apparently several different components, installs ten tons of files, and there is not a single entry either in Start menu or Control panel. I mean, what the heck is that? There's not even any readme or explanation or anything. It just says "Intel Managemement components", and noone knows what it does.
    I wouldn't mind to be able to have access to hardware info and some basic management functions on the computers in the house, but this thing by Intel smells of scratching behind your left ear with your right leg.

  7. #17
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    Thumbs down Re: Intel Management Engine Interface, is it needed?

    Octopuss,

    Your forum profile is set up so that you can't receive private messages.

    Your location "in the ass" is offensive and not permitted in the forum.

    You are now banned from the forum for 30 days.

    If you use offensive language in the future, you will be permanently banned from the forum.

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    Default Re: Intel Management Engine Interface, is it needed?

    Quote Originally Posted by lenix View Post
    Hello,

    I noticed on my new motherboard there is a device in device manager with an exclamation mark and obviously this is related to the "Intel Management Engine Interface" drivers gigabyte offers.

    I researched about this a lot, and it's of no use to me, my question is, is it needed? What is the recommendation on this? There is no option to disable this in bios, so I reckon it's necessary?

    Thanks,
    *Short - The only time you need to install the ME driver is when you want *ANY* remote data communication to the PC.

    Long -- The basic use of this hardware is for remote, the use of it's software is say a network MGR who has computers ( workstations ) that he wants to communicate with, instead of having to be physically be there. The MGR can do anything with the new versions of software. The software designed for IME ( intel management engine ) Inetl has changed, First Intel came out with MEI, started out with older chipsets. MEI has evolved, now there is AMT, which is now part of the VPro system.

    AMT- ACTIVE MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGY- Key AMT features include the ability to: remotely turn on, off, or power cycle the machine,, remotely mount an image to load on the machine,, remotely access hardware asset information,, provide serial-over-LAN (SoL) console redirection,, provide out-of-band alerts to administrators,, provide a secure TLS tunnel between the administrator and the vPro PC .

    VPro Tech- An added layer of security for businesses and intelligent systems,, Threat management, including protection from rootkits, viruses, and malware,, Identity and website access point protection,, Confidential personal and business data protection,, Remote and local monitoring, remediation, and repair of PCs and workstations.

    *** Remember, any remote communication, like Icloud remote, Orbweb ME, several others. If you don't use any of the remote software, then you don't need the driver. If you don't use USB, you don't need the driver, even though Windows will usually install it's generic.

    Intel's software is more for networking machines (workstations ) who are supervised by say IT dept, and the others are for regular users.
    Don't let the wording in the Intel active MGT fool you, only when using remote tech does the BIOS /UEFI come into play and the driver needed.

    I don't believe there has been a case where the driver was installed but not software and a hacker used the ME. You normally look at any software as having a flaw, then patched when found by Designer, and not always found before millions are using it.

    I hope this was a basic brief simple terms for anyone not understanding it.

  9. #19
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    Default Re: Intel Management Engine Interface, is it needed?

    Is it not needed for realtime clock and voltage changes of Intel CPUs, in an OS environment?

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    Post Re: Intel Management Engine Interface, is it needed?

    For those asking for practical use cases, here is one in detail with step-by-step guide: (even for home users)

    How to Remotely Control Your PC (Even When it Crashes) How-To Geek


    By the way, I would agree with odiebugs that, [in]
    *Short - The only time you need to install the ME driver is when you want *ANY* remote data communication to the PC.
    [from a remote location]

    Otherwise, there is no expressed need for ME / (I)MEI / AMT drivers if you do not plan to use it and the device can be safely disabled via device manager, since the OS (well, what OS? Windows) does not need to communicate through this interface. In this case it is also recommended to turn it off in the BIOS if there is such an option for this. It can still be re-enabled and re-installed at a later time, should the demand rise.

    I have read that on some systems an option to re-enable the remote management always remains even while the computer is in the off state (but is not unplugged from mains and network) That's how it goes: the secret agencies by themselves would not give us a chance to opt-out from 'their' hidden remote surveillance feature (in this case, developed by Intel) For those who are paranoid: remote control is based on communication over the network and therefore (in theory, at least) it can be filtered. However, not only Intel developed and incorporated such remote access tools and features into their machines but other companies (IBM, for example) did it as well, long time ago. Primary use was server administration and now the technology arrived to workstations and desktops.

    Regarding computer security and vulnerabilities, odiebugs has it right again:
    You normally look at any software as having a flaw, then patched when found by Designer, and not always found before millions are using it.
    Vulnerabilities in these management engines have already been discovered and demonstrated by security specialists that can even effect the windows operating system being used on the target machine. If the bad guys find their way they will surely exploit this.

    I think, normally Helpdesk folks and Admins benefit most from these kind of Management Engines: they do not have to walk around all their office building to service pc client computers to do some routine maintenance. There are quite a few cases when such remote manageability makes life easier. I also read that some microcode (firmware) updates are being distributed by Intel via their management engine, so there is no need for user interaction or os-based updater client software.

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