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Thread: Rambus XDR




  1. #1
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    Rambus outlines roadmap to bring XDR to main memory
    Differential signaling and Dynamic Point-to-Point technology bring unprecedented levels of bandwidth to PCs


    Rambus Inc. a leading developer of chip-to-chip interface products and services, announced its roadmap to bring XDR DRAM to the PC main memory market by 2006.

    As CPU speeds increase, and as new operating systems and software applications come to market, PC main memory requirements will quickly outgrow the limits of current mainstream memory solutions. Running at 3.2GHz, XDR DRAM offers eight times the bandwidth of today''s best-in-class PC memory. The differential signaling of XDR allows it to scale to 6.4GHz and beyond, providing PCs with unprecedented levels of memory performance.

    "Today's PC main memory systems are performance limited due to their use of single-ended signals and multi-drop data busses," said Laura Stark, vice president of the Memory Interface Division at Rambus. "Differential signaling and Rambus's novel Dynamic Point-to-Point module upgrade technology allow users to maximize capacity in their memory systems without compromising performance."

    Rambus has defined all of the ingredients necessary to bring XDR to PC main memory. These ingredients include a broad range of XDIMM memory modules, programmable-width XDR DRAMs, buffers, connectors, clock generators, and comprehensive system design guidelines and documentation.

    The XDIMM memory module will provide 12.8GB/s to 25.6GB/s of bandwidth, which is four times more memory module bandwidth in the same pin count and form factor as DDR2 DIMMs, giving the XDIMM the highest performance at the lowest system cost.

    XDR memory's novel system topology allows point-to-point differential data interconnects to scale to multi-gigahertz speeds, while the bussed address and command signals allow a scalable range of memory system capacity supporting from one to 36 DRAM devices. XDR offers a roadmap to 6.4GHz and can scale to interface widths of up to 128-bits, enabling memory system bandwidths up to 100GB/s, 16 times more than today?s 6.4GB/s memory systems. XDR DRAMs will be available in multiple speed bins, device densities, and device widths. With densities ranging from 256Mb to 8Gb, and device widths ranging from x1 to x32, XDR DRAM satisfies the needs of both high-bandwidth and high-capacity systems.

    Samsung, Elpida, and Toshiba are all DRAM licensees of Rambus's latest memory interface technology.

    Rambus XDR memory interface

    Rambus

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    Quote Originally Posted by weta
    Running at 3.2GHz, XDR DRAM offers eight times the bandwidth of today''s best-in-class PC memory. The differential signaling of XDR allows it to scale to 6.4GHz and beyond, providing PCs with unprecedented levels of memory performance.
    :wow:

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    Jesus christ 3.2Ghz.....let's hope that future systems will actually be able to use that kind of bandwidth, because right now they can't even utilize what we have.

    FX5900 - 3DMark2001 [20,566] - 3DMark2003 [7,281] - Aquamark3 [56,694]
    Ti4400 - 3DMark2001 [16,028]

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    Toshiba begins shipping XDR DRAM sample chips
    Devices are much faster than current memory chips and due in mass production in 2005


    XDR, which was formerly known by its Yellowstone development code-name, is targeted at high-performance applications such as digital consumer electronics, network systems, game consoles and graphics applications. It runs at a speed of 3.2GHz, which is significantly faster than any memory technology in use today.

    Toshiba's first samples are 512M bit DRAM (dynamic RAM) chips and come slightly ahead of schedule. When Rambus announced XDR in July this year it said it expected sample chips to begin rolling off fabrication lines at Toshiba during 2004.

    "The sample chips are a little bit early because the development well," said Makoto Yasuda, a spokesman for Toshiba in Tokyo.

    Despite the early release of sample chips, Toshiba said its mass production plans remain unchanged at 2005.

    Japan's Elpida Memory Inc. is also expected to offer sample XDR chips in 2004.

    InfoWorld / IDG News

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