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Thread: Motherboard recommendations




  1. #1

    Default Motherboard recommendations

    I am looking to renew my older machine with some newer parts and W7. My first and foremost is a mobod. I am only going to use this as a machine that hosts music for my Russound cav6.6 and also as a backup storage device. Does anyone have a recommendation for a mobod under or around $100?
    Windows 7 Professional
    (2)-ASUS VS248H-P Black 24" Monitor
    CORSAIR Hydro Series H60 (CWCH60) Liquid CPU Cooler
    ASRock Z77 Extreme4 LGA 1155 Intel Z77 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard
    Kingston Hyper X Blu 16GB
    Intel Xeon E3-1245 V2 Ivy Bridge 3.4GHz (3.8GHz Turbo) LGA 1155 77W Quad-Core Server Processor
    High Current Pro HCP-750 750W TX12V v2.3 / EPS12V v2.92 SLI Certified CrossFire Certified 80 PLUS GOLD
    SAMSUNG 830 Series MZ-7PC256B/WW 2.5" 256GB SATA III MLC Internal Solid State Drive
    3 -2TB Western Digital Black HDD
    Rosewill RDCR-11003 74-in-1 USB3.0 3.5 Internal Card Reader
    1 Asus Blu Ray Burner
    1 Plextor DVD Burner

  2. #2
    Lsdmeasap's Avatar
    Lsdmeasap is offline GIGABYTE Guru
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    PCB Island
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    25,940

    Default Re: Motherboard recommendations

    I would suggest a GA-P45-UD3P or UD3R, I think you can find them for around 100-110

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
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    keveenjones
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    4

    Default Re: Motherboard recommendations

    <style type="text/css"> <!-- @page { margin: 2cm } P { margin-bottom: 0.21cm } --> </style> As per my experience I like to suggest to you that, you can get Intel mother board DP55KG. It is very better for your work.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    New Brunswick, Canada
    Posts
    115

    Default Re: Motherboard recommendations

    I'm with Lsdmeasap. The P45 Gigabyte boards are rock solid and can handle some punishment if you are into overclocking.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Motherboard recommendations

    Not really into a lot of hard oc but want to do some. I am more into a well built board is what I am after.
    Windows 7 Professional
    (2)-ASUS VS248H-P Black 24" Monitor
    CORSAIR Hydro Series H60 (CWCH60) Liquid CPU Cooler
    ASRock Z77 Extreme4 LGA 1155 Intel Z77 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard
    Kingston Hyper X Blu 16GB
    Intel Xeon E3-1245 V2 Ivy Bridge 3.4GHz (3.8GHz Turbo) LGA 1155 77W Quad-Core Server Processor
    High Current Pro HCP-750 750W TX12V v2.3 / EPS12V v2.92 SLI Certified CrossFire Certified 80 PLUS GOLD
    SAMSUNG 830 Series MZ-7PC256B/WW 2.5" 256GB SATA III MLC Internal Solid State Drive
    3 -2TB Western Digital Black HDD
    Rosewill RDCR-11003 74-in-1 USB3.0 3.5 Internal Card Reader
    1 Asus Blu Ray Burner
    1 Plextor DVD Burner

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Bangladesh
    Posts
    4

    Default Re: Motherboard recommendations

    First you need to know activities of motherboard. A motherboard is a “printed circuit board” (PCB) with components soldered onto it. A printed circuit board is a piece of thin fiberglass with thin copper traces etched onto it. In the long-ago past, the components could be soldered onto the board using a soldering iron and manual assembly, as shown here:
    Except for hobbyists building things at home, that process is far too expensive at a factory level today.

    The next innovation was wave soldering. The components are mounted on the printed circuit board and then the board is preheated. The board runs over a pool of rippling liquid solder and the components are soldered onto the board by the ripples. You can see that process here:

    But on a modern circuit board, the chips often have so many pins, and the parts are so small, and the parts often sit on both sides of the board (open up an old cell phone to see what I mean)… so wave soldering can’t be used. Instead, the components are all “surface mounted”. The chips use ball grid arrays (BGAs) and either an oven or hot air is used to melt the balls of solder.

    A ball in a ball grid array is just a tiny ball of solder on the bottom of the chip. You can see how these balls are applied in the following video:

    If you place that chip on a printed circuit board and heat it, the balls melt and solder the chip to the board.

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