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Thread: Motherboard / PSu problem...




  1. #11
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    My view is that the PSU wasn't up to the task of running a 1.4GHz T-Bird. AMD processors, pardon the language, "rape" the 3.3V and 5V rails of a PSU. This is why Intel has invented the ATX 2.03 standard, to let the motherboard transform the 12V rail into the correct CPU core voltage.

    Why?

    The 12V rail in a PSU is often under-utilised. It powers mechanical things, such as fans, and the motors in Hard Drives and CD/DVD-ROM's. The 5V rail powers electronics such as the motherboard, drive electronics and the CPU. 5V and 3.3V power in an ATX power supply is transformed down to the correct voltage for an AMD 1.4GHz Athlon (1.75V if I remember correctly?) :?:

    Intel seized upon the idea of the 12V rail being mainly unused. The largest stress on the 12V rail is when the power button is first pressed, this is when all the fans and Hard Drives spin up. After that, you're lucky if the 12V rail is any more than 50% utilised. So Intel made it possible for the motherboard to use this free 12V capacity, freeing up the 3.3V and 5V rails to run electronics.

    This is why a 300W PSU will comfortably power a decked-out 2GHz Pentium 4 drawing over 90W of power under load. A similarly loaded AMD system will need at least 350W, if not 400W to run reliably, despite the lower current draw. When too much current is drawn through a particular rail, it gets hot and melts the insulating material (as what happened here).

    So my view is to get a larger PSU - and let's hope that AMD starts adopting the ATX 2.03 standard soon :)
    What came first - Insanity or Society?

  2. #12
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    I see, that does make alot of sense...

    That explains why everything was still working... and would explain why the wires got hot enough to burn the insulation... a surge would be so instantaneous I doubt it would burn anything... and if it did it would burn everything...


    So do you guys think that the motherboard is still good?

  3. #13
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    Heh, As you can probably imagine, if there is heat enough to melt and burn the wire insulation, its enough to melt the connector... I really pulled on it, its not going anywhere. Its melted together...

    Not much we can do ? Any other ideas would be helpful... heh

    I just realized that vbulletin can host images, I will get the pictures my friend took and post them up here for you guys...

  4. #14
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    I feel that the motherboard is still OK..... just if you can pry that sodding ATX connector out somehow :?:

    Try a very small flat bladed screwdriver, if that fails then you are up for soldering 20 wires to an ATX extender plug - this will allow you to use the melted plug with another PSU, like such:

    Motherboard --- Melted plug --- soldered wires --- ATX extender --- ATX power lead --- ATX power supply

    Hope this explains things :confused:
    What came first - Insanity or Society?

  5. #15
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    I see what you're saying, but that doesn't eliminate the problem... The heat was originating within the plastic plug, most likely where the wire meets the little electical contacts that actually electrically touch the mobo... so I Need to get the old power supply side of the plug out, because if i don't they electrical bottleneck (that caused the heat) is still there, and it will happen again... Hey I bet the cleanest solution would be to remove the ATX plug, and find an old motherboard and un-solder its plug, and then re-solder it in to the injured mobo...

    We've pulled and pryed on it hard with no luck... I don't want to crack the mobo... and if I do try to replace the plug, do you think I can solder well enough ? Heh, and will I be able to find a plug that is designed to conduct as much electricity as the T-Brid needs?

  6. #16
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    If a more powerful PSU is used, you won't have any problems with melting :)

    So don't worry about that ;)
    What came first - Insanity or Society?

  7. #17
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    Unless you're pretty confident about you soldering skills and have all the proper de-soldering tools I wouldn't go near it with a soldering iron !

    Unless you're really carefull you'd be extremely likely to cause more damage. Unless the wires in the melted plug have melted together and shorted out then Albinus's idea will be just fine.

    I guess you could also cut the plug to bits with a knife and rip bits off / out with a pair of pliers. Use a chainsaw perhaps ? Hmmm, maybe that's going overboard...
    WooHoo !! I at long last have a job ! Yay for me !


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  8. #18
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    Here's both sides of the connector...

  9. #19
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    ...

  10. #20
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    Pull out a good knife and see if ya can carefully cut the PSU end away. :smokin:
    <center>:cheers:</center>

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