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Thread: How do you reset CMOS?




  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    4

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    sorry for this question.

    and yes i admit i am a noob..

    First off. I'm gonna overclock my comp with my Athlon xp unlocking kit.. I was just wondering how to reset cmos if computer wont reboot. If it depends on motherboard my board is
    Gigabyte 7VAX

    Thanks.

    System:
    Athlon XP 1800+
    256 ddr 2100 ram
    Geforce 4 mx 440 (overclocked 6316 score on 3dmarks 2001 se)

  2. #2

    Default

    There's a jumper on your motherboard somewhere........depending on the make/model will tell its location. Look up in your manual where the jumper is and change the strapping. This will short out the battery clearing the CMOS. THen change the strapping back to how you had it before and turn ur PC on and your all set. the bios now has its factory settings.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    4,246

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    i'm not very familiar with your mobo, but in most cases, you can clear cmos by removing power from your pc and taking the battery out for a about minute, then put the battery back in, plug the psu back in and then restore your bios settings...this should even override any jumpers (i think)
    I've gone too far and need to move on!

  4. #4

    Default

    removing the PSU isn't really necessary. Removing the battery after cutting off the power will clear the BIOS. After all that's why the battery is there in the first place. SO that it can hold its settings when the power is out. Kind of like the battery in emergency lights or an alarm clock.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
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    i didn't mean that he had to phsyicaly remove the psu, just the nice shiny black power cable...and that is only as a precaution, to make sure the cmos gets cleared...if he dosn't want to pull the plug, i doubt it will make any difference
    I've gone too far and need to move on!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
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    4

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    So I should just pull out the circlish looking battery when ever the computer doesnt start?

    Is that what your guys are talking about?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    4,246

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    basically, but i wouldn't get into the habit of doing it first thing everytime the comp dosn't start...but for clearing cmos, that's how to do it....there is also a small program floating around called killcmos that requires a bootable floppy to work...i think it's name says it all. I've never actually tried it. so don't take my word for it. It just saves you the trouble of taking out the battery, or changing a jumper. But of course you would have to have a computer that will boot.
    I've gone too far and need to move on!

  8. #8

    Default

    Stick with the jumper. The last time I touched a CMOS battery was an OLD computer that hasn't been touched in years. I had to replace it. Other then that as often as the computer is on these batteries can outlast the life of the computer! However with you constantly taking the battery in and out the little piece that holds it in the socket may not last too long. And you may have a battery falling out.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    1,016

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    yeah - use the jumper, that's why they put it there

    all the Epox boards I use will start up w/failsafe bios settings if I press the ins key during boot - saves opening up the case to use the jumper:D

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    New England Highlands, Australia
    Posts
    21,907

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    Your motherboard manual will explain the proceedure required for clearing the CMOS on your mobo. If ya don't have one then d/l it from the maker's website (some Gigabyte mobo's and a few others require the use of a screwdriver to short 2 contacts). :)
    <center>:cheers:</center>

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