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Thread: Intel Prescott




  1. #21
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    <center>Intel's Prescott might be delayed until Q2 2004
    Stepping the light fantastic, cannibalising of chips
    </center>

    An article on the Akiba PC Watch site yesterday suggests that Intel may be in such trouble over its next generation Prescott microprocessor that it could be pushed back to the second quarter of next year.
    Intel's line in the last few weeks has been that it will begin revenue shipments to some PC manufacturers this quarter, with roadmaps seen by the INQ showing it would ship in late January, February.

    But, according to the Japanese article on Akiba Price Watch, Intel continues to have big problems with the Prescott design.

    The article says that Prescott – which was plagued by heat problems as we reported in spring this year, is also suffering from bus problems and difficulties related to the 875 and 865 chipsets. Many motherboard makers have released Pentium 4 boards which have the same socket for 478 pins that initial Prescotts will use, so for customers hoping to upgrade, this is a serious problem.

    The Japanese article says systems won't work with 800MHz front side buses, while Intel is frantically attempting to create fresh packaging and a further stepping – C1 – for the chip.

    But qualification samples, the article continues, aren't likely to go out the door until December. That means that if Intel makes its own February deadline, volume is unlikely to appear until the second quarter of next year. And Intel's most recent roadmaps suggested that it would start using the LGA775 design for Prescott in Q2 as well, which is when its "Grantsdale" chipsets are supposed to appear.

    If the reports are true, the delay might mean not only a boost for AMD with its Athlon 64 family, but also goes some way towards explaining why Xeon MP chips at speeds of 3.2GHz and 3.4GHz and with large caches, are in the pipeline.

    If that's so, Intel would appear to be cannibalising its own products in a bid to compete with AMD.

    Meanwhile, unconfirmed reports reach the INQUIRER that Intel might shove its Pentium 4 EE forward to the 4th of November – so called "mischief" night in some parts of the United Kingdom.

    The Inquirer

  2. #22
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    <center>Intel Prescott already has 64-bit extensions
    But not AMD64 compatible
    </center>

    We managed to find out some more information about Intel Prescott processor than the Santa Clara, California-based company wants everybody to know. According to a source whishing to remain anonymous, Intel’s next-generation NetBurst CPU code-named Prescott does have 64-bit extensions. But Intel does not desire to enable them because of some reasons, the source added.

    Apparently, the extensions may be a part of the well-known Yamhill project and will not be compatible with AMD’s 64-bit extensions available now in AMD Opteron and Athlon 64 processors.

    Intel’s top managers have been considering the enablement of the 64-bit extensions in Prescott and Tejas processors for some time now, but no final decisions have been made. What we know for sure is that Intel is not likely to turn on additional functionality of the Prescott processor until 2005, probably when AMD’s 64-bit processors become more or less wide-spread on the market and may affect Intel’s sales.

    Intel has been saying that its 32-bit and 64-bit processors will co-exist totally independently in different market segments and has never confirmed plans to implement 64-bit extensions into its IA32 chips. Intel Itanium processors, on the other hand, can emulate conventional x86, but not really fast.

    Since implementation of 64-bit extensions into desktop and entry-level server processors may potentially delay the appearance of IA64 software for desktop and cost-effective server applications, Intel should act very cautiously in respect of 64-bit extensions to IA32 chips, as the company’s long-term target seems to be the Itanium and its architecture.

    Historically additional CPU instructions deployed by Intel have been more successful that those introduced by AMD due to numerous reasons. Therefore, Intel adding 64-bit functionality into its Prescott chips and derivatives may be a negative news for AMD.

    xbit

  3. #23
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    <center>More details emerge of Intel Prescott's LGA 775</center>

    While Intel is to bring the "Prescott" processor to market in the 478 pin package, we also know that it is moving to the land grid array 775 socket faster than previously contemplated.
    Now sources in Taiwan have given us more details about how Intel will move to this socket, which Intel claims is needed for its next generation processor to achieve the right level of performance.

    The LGA socket has a load plate and a load lever, with the IHS being above all other components. Currently, our Taiwanese friends tell us, Tyco and Foxconn are already engaged with Prescott vendors, but Intel is expected to close similar deals with two other manufacturers, Molex and FCI, any day now.

    Prescott chips are expected to be available using the Socket T (775) during more or less the whole of 2004, but Intel is projecting that its next generation processor – Tejas – will start to be available towards the end of next year, and in the middle of next year will move to FMB2, and with Tejas FMB1. These will all use ICH6, it appears.

    While the BTX form factor is important to Intel and its future, the ATX motherboards will still rule the roost during next year. Our Xmole tells us that a typical microATX system using Prescott still has 110W for the CPU, 16W for the memory, 25W for the graphics, and 35W for the VR, 16W for the MCH, and 4W for ICH6 (PCI Express compatible).

    That requires a new kind of cooling, that is to say the 38 litre systems Louis XIII Burns was talking about an IDF or two back.

    The BTX form factor is important because components are cooled better, airflow impedance is reduced, the paths are simpler, and there will be cost advantages. If all pans out, there will be less fans, less heatsinks, and where heatsinks are needed, cheaper ones.

    Next Intel Developer Forum in February, says our Xmole at Intel Taiwan's CPU centre, Louis XIII may well show off a BTX reference system, with customers starting to sell these systems in the middle of next year.

    By 2007, Intel hopes the world+dog will be BTX only.

    Intel has come up with a cunning design for Socket T and PCI Express, that will allow for an adjustable air funnel.

    Socket T also needs a larger motherboard keep out, with the clip and fasteners part of the heatsink, a fan speed control, and an omni directional flow.

    The Prescott FMB2 heatsink requirements are already being farmed out to Intel customers as we speak.

    The power supply units (PSUs) for Mr Prescott need changing because of PCI Express, which needs 75W, but we won't see those designs until Q1 of next year, it appears. An additional 12 volt rail is needed.

    The Inquirer

  4. #24
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    <center>Intel Prescott launch date set!
    Very early February
    </center>

    Sources close to Intel said the company plans to formally launch its 90nm desktop processors code-named Prescott on the 2nd of February, 2004. As expected, the firm will ship a family of Prescott chips at different frequencies under Pentium 4 with SSE3 brand-name.

    Monday, the 2nd of February will be a big day for Intel, as the company unveils 7 new desktop microprocessors on that date. The list includes 4 Prescott processors with 1MB of L2 cache, 800MHz Quad Pumped Bus, SSE3, HT technology, running at 3.40GHz, 3.20GHz, 3.00GHz and 2.80GHz; Pentium 4 Extreme Edition processor at 3.40GHz with 2MB cache, 800MHz QPB and HT technology; Intel Pentium 4 Northwood with 512KB cache at 3.40GHz; Intel Pentium 4 2.80A processor with 533MHz PSB, 1MB of cache, SSE3, based on Prescott core, but without HT technology.

    The new NetBurst chips will be priced as follows:

    Intel Pentium 4 Extreme Edition 3.40GHz - $999
    Intel Pentium 4 SSE3 “Northwood” 3.40GHz - $417
    Intel Pentium 4 SSE3 “Prescott” 3.40GHz - $417
    Intel Pentium 4 SSE3 “Prescott” 3.20GHz - $278
    Intel Pentium 4 SSE3 “Prescott” 3.00GHz - $218
    Intel Pentium 4 SSE3 “Prescott” 2.80GHz - $178
    Intel Pentium 4 SSE3 “Prescott” 2.80A - $163

    On the 15th of February the world’s largest microprocessor supplier with align “Northwood” and “Prescott” pricing, as a result, the chips with 512KB of cache and 1MB of cache will be priced equally.

    Initial Prescott processors will come in 478-pin packaging, but, at least, some of them will not be compatible with current Socket 478 mainboards. In the second quarter next year Intel will bring processors and mainboards featuring LGA775 packaging.

    Intel Prescott processor confronted a number of difficulties on its way to the market. Originally slated to come in the Q2 2003, the chip will be formally announced nearly three quarters later – on the 2nd of February 2004. Furthermore, some analysts indicate potential issues with increasing clock-speeds of Prescott processor because of effects similar to dielectric breakdown or so-called tunnel effect in Intel’s 90nm high-speed CPUs.

    According to some sources, Intel’s Prescott design does have 64-bit extensions in addition to improvements in Hyper-Threading implementation and SSE3 realization. These extensions are not compatible with AMD64 technology and will not be enabled in first Prescott chips. Moreover, some say Intel is not likely to turn on additional functionality of the Prescott processor until 2005, probably when AMD’s 64-bit processors become more or less wide-spread on the market and may affect Intel’s sales.

    Intel’s officials did not comment on the report.

    xbit

  5. #25
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    That is some damn nice prices :D

    Intel Pentium 4 SSE3 “Prescott” 3.20GHz - $278
    Intel Pentium 4 SSE3 “Prescott” 3.00GHz - $218
    Intel Pentium 4 SSE3 “Prescott” 2.80GHz - $178

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by weta
    Intel’s officials did not comment on the report.
    I'm not surprised about that as the core is just so late now gettin' to market now. :2cents:

  7. #27
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    Wow those prices are really attractive. I guess the decision is whether you want to wait another 1.5-2 months:?:
    I'm a newb. Be nice.
    3.0C P4
    WD Raptor primary drive
    Maxtor 120Gb secondary
    ASUS p4c800 deluxe mobo
    1024MB Kingston pc3200 memory
    SB Audigy 2 LS Sound Card
    Lite on cd-rw/dvd combo drive
    Thermaltake Lanfire case w/ 420w PS
    Logitech z-640 speakers
    Sapphire 9600XT
    ...just need a monitor

  8. #28
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    That's what I'm doing. I will be also getting a new video (5700 Ultra or 5900 XT) at the same time. Hopefully, prices will drop a bit. :)
    ==| PC specs |==
    1. Intel Pentium 4 3.0C ghz
    2. Gigabyte 5900XT
    3. Gigabyte GA-8IPE1000 Pro
    4. Kingmax PC3200 DDR RAM (2 x 256mb on dual channel)
    5. Western Digital 80gb 7200rpm HD (8mb cache)

  9. #29
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    Prescott and upgrading

    Very simply put, can you upgrade from Northwood to Prescott on your current mainboard? The simple answer is, some of you will, and some of you won't.

    Read the article

    HardOCP

    ** Sorry Clubsport, just spotted that you've already got this story covered **

  10. #30
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    That article was very interesting. Now, I don't know if I should wait until the Prescott goes in the 775 packaging. I might as well stick with a P4 3C ghz when prices drop.
    ==| PC specs |==
    1. Intel Pentium 4 3.0C ghz
    2. Gigabyte 5900XT
    3. Gigabyte GA-8IPE1000 Pro
    4. Kingmax PC3200 DDR RAM (2 x 256mb on dual channel)
    5. Western Digital 80gb 7200rpm HD (8mb cache)

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