Please report all spam threads, posts and suspicious members. We receive spam notifications and will take immediate action!
Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 35

Thread: Pentium 4 Extreme Edition




  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Posts
    1,661

    Default

    <center><img src="http://images.tweaktown.com/news/news_intel p4-ee.jpg">

    Extreme Processors from Intel: Pentium 4 with 2MB L3 Cache and Dual-Core Xeon CPU</center>

    During today’s Intel Developer Forum Fall 2003 Intel discussed a couple of its extremely innovative and powerful microprocessors that will come in short- and long-terms. As you probably understood, I talk about the soon-to-come Intel Pentium 4 processor with 2MB of L3 cache as well as dual-core Intel Xeon processor coming in 2005.

    In order to answer AMD Athlon 64 FX processors with a 32-bit processor boasting with ultimate performance, Intel will launch its Pentium 4 Extreme Edition processor for hardcore gamers and PC enthusiasts. The processor will feature 800MHz Quad Pumped Bus, 3.20GHz clock-speed and the Hyper-Threading technology. But the main weapon of this incredible CPU will be its 2MB of L3 cache in addition to its 512KB of L2 cache! The processor will consist of 108 million of transistors, nearly doubled figure from the original Northwood core. As our Intel sources suggest, the Pentium 4 Extreme Edition are based on Xeon “Gallatin” core with a bit different micro architecture.

    The chip will hardly give a huge performance advantage over the current Intel Pentium 4 3.20GHz with 512KB of L2 for all applications, but those, which are dependent on PSB or CPU caches will certainly benefit from the large L3 cache of the Intel Pentium 4 Extreme Edition processor.

    In the long-term future Intel will release another extreme CPU, but this time for the enterprise markets. The dual-core chip currently known as Tulsa will emerge in about two year’s time. This will be the first Xeon and also the first IA32 microprocessor with two cores. Thanks to the Hyper-Threading technology, the chip will be able to handle four or even eight threads at once, competing with solutions from other server chipmakers. The Intel Xeon "Tulsa" processor will also open the door into the multi-threaded era for relatively cost-effective applications.

    Xbit

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Posts
    1,661

    Default

    <center>Intel Pentium 4 Extreme Edition</center>

    Although Intel doesn’t talk openly about their main competitor, AMD Company, they are somewhat concerned about AMD’s success. Especially now that AMD is preparing a real blow for the market on September 23. As you know the company is getting ready to launch their new Athlon 64 3200+ and Athlon 64 FX-51. Due to larger L2 cache and integrated memory controller, alongside with other architectural improvements, these processors will most probably win the leadership from Intel. As a result, AMD will at least temporarily become the performance leader from the top CPU models point of view.

    Intel is really trying not to let the Athlon story repeat. However, unfortunately, the CPU, which will be the one to compete with Athlon 64, Prescott, is not ready yet. Prescott, which will be produced with 90nm technology is expected to come to the market only in the very end of this year. That is why Intel started looking for other ways to make faster processors with 0.13micron technology

    Intel cannot increase the core frequency of the Northwood based processors anymore. The production technology used here has been almost completely exhausted. However, luckily Intel still has a back up solution. This solution is the Xeon and Xeon MP architecture with L3 cache, no matter how strange it seems to you. This where Intel started looking for the possibility to speed up its processors in the nearest future.

    Also Louis Burns said that they have worked very closely with gaming community for a while. They have studied the needs and desires of this specific user group and are planning to introduce a brand new Intel processor for gaming community and PC enthusiasts: Pentium 4 with Hyper-Threading and additional 2MB cache. The CPU will work at 3.2GHz and will be called Intel Pentium 4 Extreme Edition. It should be available in 30-60 days from the OEMs.

    This way, Pentium 4 Extreme Edition will be none other but a certain analogue to Xeon MP for Socket478. In other words, Pentium 4 Extreme Edition will be just a regular Pentium 4 3.2GHz on Northwood core with Hyper-Threading and 800MHz bus, but featuring a 2MB L3 cache. Probably Intel hopes that adding L3 cache to this processor will allow boosting its performance a lot.

    Here I would like to say that adding the 2MB L3 cache will make the total data volume, which can be stored in the caches of Pentium 4 Extreme Edition, equal to only 2MB. The thing is that Pentium 4 caches are based on inclusive architecture (unlike the caches of AMD Athlon CPUs), that is why the data from the L2 cache of the Pentium 4 processor will be duplicated in the L3 cache.

    Another interesting issue worth mentioning is the price of the “new” Pentium 4 Extreme Edition. For example, today Xeon MP 2.8GHz with 2MB cache costs $3692. I don’t think that this is an acceptable price for gamers and hardware enthusiasts, for whom this product is actually targeted. Xeon DP 3.2GHz with a 1MB cache, which is due on October 5, 2003, will cost $851. This is also quite a big sum of money, although this is much better already. In general, Pentium 4 Extreme Edition should be priced like Athlon 64 FX-51, that is why it will probably cost around $700.

    Xbit

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Posts
    1,661

    Default

    Pentium 4 EE 3.4 GHz and 3.2 GHz benchmarks!

    Ace's Hardware has posted the very first Pentium 4 EE benchmark results, which were carried out in its labs and not Intel's.

    Interestingly, Intel PR confirmed that a BIOS upgrade is not a requirement to run the new CPU. The 2MB L3 cache of the Xeon MP...euh... Pentium 4 EE will be recognized without upgrading the BIOS. This also applies for boards from other manufacturers (besides Intel).

    Even more Interesting is that the default multiplier of our Pentium 4 EE test sample was 17, or in other words this seems to be a 3.4 GHz sample! Now it is possible that our AOpen AX4C Max (i875 chipset) is responsible for this, but I doubt it. In the past 2 years, I have never seen any Intel CPU that could use a multiplier higher than it's default multiplier. Some samples were unlocked, but could only use *lower* multipliers. So, we do not even have Pentium 4 EE benchmarks, we can also add 3.4 GHz results. It seems that Intel could push the Pentium 4 EE to 3.4 GHz fairly easy, because this sample was running at 3.4 GHz with core voltage of 1.55V.

    System: AOpen AX4CMax, with 2x 512 MB Corsair XMS DDR400 (2-3-3-7), and a Leadtek Geforce FX 5900 Ultra 256 MB.

    Comanche 1024x768x32

    P4 3.4 GHz EE : 73.8
    P4 3.2 GHz EE : 70.4
    P4 3.2 GHz : 61.8

    Unreal Tournament Asbestos Botmatch 1280x1024x32

    P4 3.4 GHz EE : 104.4
    P4 3.2 GHz EE : 99.7
    P4 3.2 GHz : 90.4

    Wolfenstein Ennemy Territory 1024x768x32 High quality

    P4 3.4 GHz EE : 142.6
    P4 3.2 GHz EE : 135.9
    P4 3.2 GHz : 130.8

    Unreal II (patched to 1.03)

    P4 3.4 GHz EE : 68.9
    P4 3.2 GHz EE : 65.6
    P4 3.2 GHz : 61.2

    Cinebench 2003

    P4 3.4 GHz EE : 407
    P4 3.2 GHz EE : 386
    P4 3.2 GHz : 380

    As we expected the 2 MB L3-cache can not do any wonders for Games, which are somewhat cacheable but also need streams of new data (memory intensive). The best result is a 14% in Comanche, which is of course quite impressive, as it means the L3-cache pushes the 3.2 GHz to the level of a 3.7 GHz Pentium 4. Quite a few games give only a 5-6% performance increase. Whether or not the P4 3.2 GHz will be an interesting option for hard core games will depend on the pricetag.

    Ace's Hardware

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    476

    Default

    when 64 ariives............and who will support and yes weta how much?...............so if amd keeps scaling, there will be separation

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Posts
    1,661

    Default

    Pentium 4 3.2GHz Extreme Edition Reviews

    Firing Squad
    Nordic Hardware

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    476

    Default

    compares the ee to the 64.........it's no contest

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    1,790

    Default

    Look at the gains the EE gets in gaming....





    And that's only the 3.2. Looks like that cache makes a huge difference in gaming.

    FX5900 - 3DMark2001 [20,566] - 3DMark2003 [7,281] - Aquamark3 [56,694]
    Ti4400 - 3DMark2001 [16,028]

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    476

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    1,790

    Default

    What's that supposed to be telling me? I posted those graphs to show the gains the new 3.2 EE gets over the regular 3.2, not the AMD.

    FX5900 - 3DMark2001 [20,566] - 3DMark2003 [7,281] - Aquamark3 [56,694]
    Ti4400 - 3DMark2001 [16,028]

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    4,246

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Soulburner
    What's that supposed to be telling me? I posted those graphs to show the gains the new 3.2 EE gets over the regular 3.2, not the AMD.
    it's understandable considering over half of the CPUs on those graphs are Athlon64's. I thought you were trying to compare the Athlon64 to the P4 3.2 ee as well, until you posted that^. Take a look at those graphs you posted, it's a pretty reasonable assumption.
    I've gone too far and need to move on!

Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •