Please report all spam threads, posts and suspicious members. We receive spam notifications and will take immediate action!
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 14 of 14

Thread: Intel news




  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Posts
    1,661

    Default

    <img src="http://images.tweaktown.com/weta/intel/lga-775_roadmap.gif">

    AnandTech

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Posts
    1,661

    Default

    Intel to demo 'CT' 64-bit processor line at IDF

    Intel is expected to provide a sneak preview of its x86-based, 64-bit processor line during the Intel Developers Forum (IDF) Feb. 17-19.
    "They will demonstrate it at IDF," said Nathan Brookwood of market watcher Insight64 in Saratoga, Calif.

    The new processor is a major change in strategy for Intel. Seeking to fend off a sudden charge from rival Advanced Micro Devices Inc. (AMD), Intel has been working on its code-named "CT" technology for 32/64-bit processor designs. Formerly called "Yamhill", "CT" enables a 32-bit chip to support 64-bit programs.

    Most observers believe an Intel processor based on "CT" is not due out until 2005.

    Brookwood said Intel's x86-based, 64-bit chip is codenamed "Tejas." That desktop microprocessor is expected to be the follow-on to the newly-announced Prescott processor, which is basically a 90-nm version of the Pentium 4. The Pentium 4 processor line is based on 130-nm process technology.

    Intel's Prescott can also support 64-bit extensions, but it is unlikely the company will offer that chip in a 64-bit version, Brookwood. The Prescott, with 64-bit extensions, is not compatible with AMD's 64-bit devices, he said.

    When Intel rolls out its new processor, the real challenge is how the company will market the Itanium line of 64-bit processors. Intel's Itanium is a 64-bit chip, but the product runs x86-based, 32-bit applications in emulation mode.

    EE Times

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Posts
    1,661

    Default

    Intel to redesign Pentium 4 E processors
    Prescott to receive new stepping


    Intel confirmed its intention to redesign the core of the latest Pentium 4 processors made at 90nm nodes. The company’s clients will receive the improved versions of Intel’s code-named Prescott chips in late February, the company said.

    The Pentium 4 processors with 1MB L2 cache on the 90nm process technology will undergo C-0 to the D-0 core processor stepping change. The fresh D-0 stepping will incorporate planned power optimizations to enable speed enhancements, something that Pentium 4 “Prescott” processors badly need these days.

    Currently Pentium 4 2.80E and 3.00E microprocessors dissipate up to 89W of power, Pentium 4 3.20E and 3.40E dissipate up to 103W of heat. 0.13 micron Pentium 4 processors 2.80C, 3.00GHz and 3.20GHz have 69.7W, 81.9W, and 82W thermal guideline respectively.

    Intel postponed the release of its Pentium 4 processors on the 90nm technology from Q2 2003 to Q1 2004 because of process related yield issues, Intel’s President and COO Paul Otellini indicated during a recent interview. By announcing stepping change, Intel either confirms previously said statement about troubles with process technology or indicates problems with Prescott design.

    It is not absolutely clear what is actually negative about Intel’s new CPUs, but keeping in mind that Intel’s other 90nm processor code-named Dothan designed by the company’s developers in Israel and that has nothing to do with Prescott is also postponed, it is logical to suggest that there are fabrication technology or material-related issues. The issues presumably affect yields, ability to increase core-clock and heat dissipation/power consumption of the products.

    According to Intel’s statement to partners, samples of the first D-0 stepping CPUs will be available on February 27, 2004, while qualification should be completed by April 23, 2004. Commercial chips based on the improved core will ship on the 7th of May. CPUID of the post-conversed CPUs will change from 0F33h to 0F34h, but the chips will remain pin-to-pin compatible.

    The co said it will use D-0 core for Pentium 4 2.80E, 3.00E, 3.20E and 2.80A microprocessors, but is also likely to use it for some future chips as well. Intel is expected to ship its 90nm processors at 3.40GHz and 3.60GHz on March and in the Q2 respectively.

    Xbit

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Posts
    1,661

    Default

    Intel helps improve Power Supply Units efficiency
    PSUs to waste 25% less energy


    Intel along with four major makers of power supplies units for PCs have agreed to follow Intel’s new guidelines for making PSUs in order to cut down power consumption of PCs.

    It is not a secret that personal computers as well as components for PCs do not require a lot of power all the time. Even modern processors that can devour up to 100W of power under heavy load, consume a lot less under typical loads by widely available software. However, as the upper limit of PC components’ electricity consumption rises, so does the power rating of PSUs. All those multi-hundred-watts power supply units continue to carry electricity from outlets even when PCs do not require so much power. That extra power is called waste and can apparently account for up to 25% of total personal computer power consumption.

    Intel’s new initiative is reflected in the most recent version of the ATX12V Power Supply Design Guide. The world’s largest chipmaker advices PSU manufacturers to increase efficiency of their products in order to reduce waste and power consumption of modern and future personal computers.

    The power supply required minimum is 70% efficient under “Full” load, 70% under “typical” load, and 60% in a “light” load or idle condition. Recommended minimum efficiency figures are 75%, 80% and 68% for “Full”, “Typical” and “Light” conditions respectively.

    “Our back-of-the envelope calculations are that inefficiencies in the power supply could account for almost 25% of total system power,” said Todd Brady, a product ecology program manager in Intel’s Technology and Manufacturing Group in an interview to News.com.

    Reduced consumption of power may translate into electricity payments savings along with environmental benefits. However, the increasing power consumption of personal computers’ hardware may not allow to decrease the consumption of future computers compared to today’s, but the measures Intel advices to take could allow power consumption of PCs to stay in line with what we have now.

    Additionally, the 2x10 main ATX power connector has been replaced by a 2x12 connector in ATX12V Power Supply Design. This was made to support 75W PCI Express requirements. Pinout assignments are based on the SSI recommendation.

    With the added 12V, 5V, and 3.3V pins the need for an Aux Power connector is no longer needed and the guidance for this connector has been removed.

    Revamped PSUs will cost about $5 or $6 more compared to ordinary devices. Delta Electronics, Enhance Electronics, Sparkle Power and Celetron USA have already agreed to make more efficient power supplies.

    Xbit

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •