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Thread: AMD versus Intel CPU's




  1. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
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    1,364

    Default Re: AMD versus Intel CPU's

    Yes. All Venice CPUs overclock the same. A 3000+ CPU will overclock just as high as the 3800+ CPU. If you want Venice, get the 3000+ as you are only paying for the higher multiplier with the 3800+. In my experience, I get more performance at lower clockspeeds with the San Diego. You should shop around for a better price on the San Diego as they are ALOT cheaper than the 3800+ where I shop. Here is the links:
    LINK TO 3800+ VENICE
    3700+ SAN DIEGO LINK
    GIgabyte GA-990FXA-UD3
    AMD FX8120 @ 4GHz
    Patriot 1866MHz EL series 2X4GB DDR3
    Powercolour HD 6970 2GB w/XFX 8800GT 512MB Hybrid PhysX
    Creative X-FI titanium HD w/Technics class A 300W amp and tower speakers
    PC P&C 500W PSU
    2TB Seagate
    Coolermaster 690II w/Corsair H100 tucked under the hood

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Minnesota, United States
    Posts
    4,543

    Default Re: AMD versus Intel CPU's

    Agreed. If you're going single core, the 3700 certainly will overclock better, and you would be better off with a 3000 than a 3800 if you want a cheaper, overclocked processor.

    However, unless you'll be doing little multitasking and next to no video encoding, I'd suggest you grab a 3800 X2. I know I would if I were on your budget.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    USA
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    925

    Default Re: AMD versus Intel CPU's

    Now I'm really confused..... AMD is certainly harder to understand than Intel, since the make seems to matter more than the advertised gloat number.
    I'm assuming a good mainboard will make a difference how high an AMD CPU can overclock just as with P4's, or am I wrong.
    Why are high end AMD CPU's rated at 2.2GHZ and 2.4GHz while the intel line is over 3.6GHz? How can Intel lie so badly about something like that and get away with it? Then someone else has to advertise their product at just over half the advertised speed and has a product that will run circles around the compitition? It'll be interseting to compare the new AMD system to my present Intel systems when I and get all the parts for it.



    Yawgm0th, I'm setting my budget for a CPU between $250 and $300US. At first I was considering spending more and getting a dual core (X2) CPU but I'm pretty sure dual core isn't worth the hype (for me) just yet. Sounds comparable to the dual processor mainboards with 2 CPU sockets that were sold 10 years ago or so, with the main difference being you only need one spendy CPU versus two regulars. Who knows when or if more software will be developed to take advatage of that. It didn't seem like it was way back then and I think I'm going to gamble that the same will happen again.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Minnesota, United States
    Posts
    4,543

    Default Re: AMD versus Intel CPU's

    They aren't lying about anything. It's just that having a faster clock speed doesn't neccessarily mean it's a faster processor. It's hard to explain, but suffice it to say that an Athlon 64 will be much faster than a Pentium 4 with a much higher clock speed.

    As for overclocking, motherboards aren't as much of a problem with AMD as with Intel. With Intel, you really have to go for certain motherboards to make sure you can get a decent overclock. More importantly, it's much more expensive for overclockable motherboards. With AMD, it's a little different. You can go with one of the better overclockers, such as any DFI nForce 4 Ultra board, or you can go with something cheaper that won't overclock quite as well, but will still get great overclock, such as a Chaintech nF4 board.

    Multiprocessor motherboards have been around for much longer than ten years and are still extremely popular today. They will probably continue to be so until processors get somewhere in the area of 16+ cores. The difference between a dual-processor board and a dual-core processor is primarily price. It's much cheaper to get a single dual-core processor than a dual-processor board and two processors of the same speed. For starters, both Xeons and Opterons cost more than their equally-clocked desktop counterparts. Motherboards are also much more expensive, with a dual-processor motherboard generally being $200 or more, while a sub-$80 board is fine for dual-core.

    As far as software goes, multicore is the way of the future. Not many desktop applications are using it right now, but you can expect to see them start coming in pretty soon. Regardless of that, multithreaded applications are not the reason I recommend dual-core CPUs. Multitasking is the reason. A dual-core processor provides a tremendous boost to multitasking. Combined with over 1GB of RAM, it even negates the benefits of most performance tweaking. The way most people run their systems, a dual-core processor can outperform its single-core counterpart in gaming (for example) simply because background applications take up processor time that could be on a second core. It also allows you to leave certain things running while you play a game or do another intensive application. The benefits might not be so tangible when it comes to comparing clean systems performing the same application, but throw in some realistic scenarios for computer use (see those Anandtech links), the benefit is huge.

    If you really don't care much for multitasking performance, then you'll be fine with a single-core CPU. It will be more cost-effective for pure gaming performance, though most games are GPU-limited these days anyway. But you'll be happy to have that second core when you're doing something other than gaming.

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