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Thread: Exclusive Look at Fusion-io ioDrive - PCIe Solid State




  1. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    5

    Default Re: Exclusive Look at Fusion-io ioDrive - PCIe Solid State

    Thank you Chrisram for the informations,
    just a question about the IOPS, are you sure that the block size is 512MB and not 512B? Normally the file server (like file printer server, email exchange, Notes, Decision support system) use a 4KB-64KB block size range.
    Web servers (like Web services, blog, File RSS, Caddy, Search engine, Storage service) use block size from 512B to 512KB.

    Anyway, about the fusionIO:
    I had see the same "write amplification" problem with the drive version 1.2.0 (the first official driver realese) here you can see all the details about the slow down bench of the ioDrive + 1.2.0 drivers.
    Thank you carlonyto for the great explication, but I was thinking that with the new drivers, the 1.2.1 realese, the problem was fixed. I don't have test it yet with new drivers, but if I read what carlonyto say I should understand that the problem still exist.

    Has you can read in the linked topic, this slow down problem was typical also for the Intel MLC, with permanent slow down (you have to run Secure erase to reset the drive Intel MLC into original performances).
    I have finished today the test of the Intel X-25 SLC and also the Intel SLC drive have the same slow down problem, but it regain easy and quickly all the performances. (if you want more details about the intel SLC slow down, just look in the same linked forum and you'll find it soon in the test evaluation section).

    I saw 2 relevant points:
    1) 1 single Intel SLC have above the same IOPS than the FusionIO, it depends of the access specifications.
    One single Intel SLC have

    34'086.76 IOPS

    for a 512B block size, 80%read and 20% write, 16 outstandings.
    At the same access specifications the ioDrive with 1.2.0 driver had "just"

    24'515,11 IOPS,

    and in order to compare a HDD Western Digital Caviar have 127.63 IOPS)

    2) the intel SLC regains its performances very quickly. (just run HDTAch in full write mode).

    For the areca, I think that it is a great card, for less than 800$ you can work easy with 2 GB Cache (even 4GB cache) -when you enable the cache, you better have a battery backup or a UPS-
    at 1600/1500 MB/s r/w,
    no matter wich drive you put in the Raid, even 2 HDD (then when the cache is fulled you will slow down at the drives performances and access times, but it is very difficult to full 4 GB cache!). So, for less than 1'000$ you have something like an Hyperdrive4.
    But if you make an array with 8 Intel X-25 SLC you better turn off the cache...(only 2 x Intel X-25 SLC in raid0 reach 500MB/s read performances!).

    I think it is fine to have a drive without a cache, only if the drives works faster than the cache (like 8xIntel X25 SLC).
    So why does the ioDrive not have a cache? I mean, its Nand works "only" at 700MB/s and for less than 800 $ you can buy an areca that allow you to work with 4GB cache at 1600MB/s.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    2

    Default Re: Exclusive Look at Fusion-io ioDrive - PCIe Solid State

    I would like to know if there is a way to add a PCI Express slot to an older PC which has a PCI slot. I sure would like to use a fusion-io board, because every PC I have ever worked with has run poorly (too slow) because of the drag of a slow hard drive.

    I suppose I am going to have to buy a newer PC in order to benefit from a fusion-io board - what specs for a new PC are required to do this?

    The whole paradigm for accessing a hard drive needs readdressed. I wrote a database application once in VB6 and it ran too slowly to be used. I rewrote the application using DAO (data access objects, available in VB6) to build a RAM table of record ID and physical location information. Then searches for a record were conducted in RAM and DAO was used to "pluck" the physical record as needed. The result was instantaneous execution because searching on the hard drive was eliminated.

    Better hard drives, such as the fusion-io, are needed but so are better access techniques.

    Will the fusion-io products become available for end users at affordable prices?

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    5

    Default Re: Exclusive Look at Fusion-io ioDrive - PCIe Solid State

    Yes, the fusion-io is a good solution, it work in a standard PCI slot, but not at the top of performances. You will need an additional 2 GB RAM every 80GB of Fusion-io.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    2

    Default Re: Exclusive Look at Fusion-io ioDrive - PCIe Solid State

    It may seem backwards to want to use a fusion-io in a standard PCI slot, but my current system is working pretty well, except that the hard drive
    is too slow.

    I was unaware, though, that you could plug a PCI Express device into a
    PCI slot. Electrically, PCI is a parallel interface and PCI Express is high speed serial. But maybe PCI devices are "smart" and will recognise the slot they are plugged into. If fusion-io is backward compatible to PCI that would be great for me.

    I need to look into this further. I have a request for info posted on the fusion-io web site.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Secret Bunker
    Posts
    140

    Default Re: Exclusive Look at Fusion-io ioDrive - PCIe Solid State

    As far as I know you can't plug a PCIe card into a PCI slot. The voltages are wrong and nothing lines up to even attempt it.

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