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Thread: 2 hard drives in 1 machine ????




  1. #1
    thomson1968 Guest

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    I've got a 60gb hard drive just now.
    Its hooked up to the MB with a ribbon cable going into the primary IDE slot, the ribbon has a spare available connector on it.
    On the secodary IDE slot both my dvd and cd/rw drives are connected to that slot.

    I'am going to buy a larger HD maybe about 120 - 180gb in size and I'll make sure the new one is a fast model, whats the speeds (7500rpm, ??) and I would also like to keep the excisting 60gb one if possible.

    I dont know how fast the old one is in terms of RPM but I can tell you that its about 2 years old and its a western digital model.

    So how do I hook both of them up together ??? Do I simply connect the new one to the spare connector on the ribbon and turn the computer on ??? Should they be In a specific order on the ribbon ??? What about windows, how does windows get onto the new one ??? etc etc etc ?????

    I would be planning on using the older one to store stuff on I.E - Movies and things like that.....And....The newer one would be getting used for the general operation of the computer.

    Could someone please advise me ?????

    Cheers, :cheers: :cheers: :cheers: :cheers: :cheers: :cheers:

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Texas, USA
    Posts
    4,825

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    Easy money here. :)

    If you look on the back of your hard drives, you will see some small pins where you can install a jumper. Since you want the new large drive to be your primary, just put the jumper so that it is the Master. Do the same thing with the 60GB drive but make it the Slave. There should be a small graphic sticker on the top of your WD drive to tell you how to position this jumper. From there, you'll hook up your drives to the ribbon cable and boot. You'll need to reinstall Windows on the new drive (of course), but you'll have plenty of storage after this is accomplished.

    Oh, and while I can't say for sure without seeing the designators on the drive, but your older WD is more than likely an ATA100 model and spins at either 5400 or 7200 RPM depending on the model. ;)
    Old age and treachery will overcome youth and skill
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    418

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    Read the directions that come with the new drive. It will explain setting the jumper to - master, slave, and cable select.
    If you are still in doubt. Do a search on google for "hooking up a second harddrive."
    It is simple and painless. Although it would be good to read up on it before you hook it up so you know what is going on.

    Good luck,
    Chez

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Posts
    4,723

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    I'm not trying to pour water on the flame here, no sir.
    But I do wish to say that sometimes WD drives can be just a tad fussy about the jumper arrangements.

    Don't know why exactly, but it's often true.
    Occasionally it is necessary to configure the "Master" as an Only Drive and the "Slave" as Slave.

    I don't mean to make things difficult or to wish difficulty upon you, I'm just saying that if the standard jumper settings don't produce for you, then don't be afraid to try a non-conventional setting.

    Of course, use the standard setting first, it may be all you need.

    Drive containing the OS = Master
    Second HDD for files = Slave

    1 more thought I'd like to share;
    A 180G drive is a fairly massive amount of data.
    When the time comes to reinstall Windows comes (and, it always does) you don't want to have to go burning 150G of data in order to keep it beyond the format of the drive.
    Instead, create a 5 or 10G Primary partition to put Windows on - that way your 170/+G will remain unaffected by a reformat of your OS partition.

    Again, a bit of learning is needed (not too much and only confusing the first time) but that bit of advanced preperation will save you much time in the future.

    Oh wait, just one more thing!

    Master drive goes to the connector at the end of the IDE cable - Slave drive goes to the connector in the middle.

    You get any questions or anything, just come on back here and my posse will get you hooked up quick, fast and in a hurry
    :thumb:
    The reason a diamond shines so brightly is because it has many facets which reflect light.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    418

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    I just thought of something else myself.
    Double check your jumper settings before hooking your harddrive up.
    A few years ago, (after having a few beers!), when they didn't laminate the jumper settings on the drive cover, I thought I remembered the jumper setting and hooked it up, thinking if it was wrong I could just change it(not). I hooked it up, hit power, and the pcb started smoking, not good! I must of hooked the jumper up wrong and had the power pin hooked up to the wrong one!
    Most drives now have the settings laminated on the cover, helps when you don't want to find the manual!
    So anyway, just double check prior to hitting power...

    Chez

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    64

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    Doesn't using 2 HDD on the same cable slow down the pc?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Posts
    4,723

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    If you have your BIOS set to Auto-Detect drives, it might take a second longer to recognize the drive properly and move onto the boot process.

    No big deal, and you could always opt to configure the drive instead of using the Auto-Detect.

    It is true that 2 drives on an IDE channel will default to the lowest ATA.
    So if your hooking an ATA 100 drive on the same channel as an ATA 66 drive, the entire channel will default to the lower ATA 66 transfer rate. (which is why you want to avoid placing a HDD on the same channel as a slower CD/CD-RW drive.

    As far as 2 HDD's of the same transfer rate - shouldn't be any significant difference between using 2 compared to just 1.
    The reason a diamond shines so brightly is because it has many facets which reflect light.

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