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Thread: xp eating harddrive space?




  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
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    Here's a little problem I'm facing with my new western digital 120gb hard drive (8mb buffer). In the Bios it shows it as a 120gb hard drive. When I loaded windows xp onto it, It says that it's only a total of 111gb? What happened to those 9 other gigs? Is this normal? Is there a way I can get this space back. My last laptop three years ago only had a 6gb hard drive so 9gb is lot of space to me! Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    A real GB = 1024MB's but HDD manufacturers use 1000MB's = GB plus any partitions you may have added cut's this down also. ;)
    <center>:cheers:</center>

  3. #3
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    BITS vs. BYTES !!!
    it's just the way that it's calculated...
    the bigger the hd, the more difference you see...with a small hd, you'll "lose" a couple mb, but with the new, larger hds, you see a "loss" of a few gb....
    but don't worry, it's not lost, because it was never there to start with....

  4. #4
    Beefy Guest

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    IT's not actually bits vs bytes... it's like Wiggo said. Manufacturers take the easy way out and round their storage figures off to a clean cut number.

  5. #5
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    really, i was sure that was it..sorry, forget my last post then..:snip:

  6. #6
    Beefy Guest

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    You weren't actually far wrong, if you had of kept explaining you might have got it right. :)

    All the different values (kilobyte, megabyte, gigabyte, etc..) are calculated by using 2. Probably doesn't make sense, but try this:

    1 Kilobyte = 2^10 (2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2) =1,024 bytes.
    1 Megabyte = 2^20 = 1,048,576 bytes
    1 Gigabyte = 2^30 = 1,073,741,824 bytes

    Whereas when manufacturers put sizes, they simply round off to the nearest big number... ie:

    1 Kilobyte = 1,000 bytes
    1 Megabyte = 1,000,000 bytes
    1 Gigabyte = 1,000,000,000 bytes

    Now there was soem talk that the manufacturer sizes used a different notation to show what size it was (Gb instead of GB, or something like that) but I've got no idea about that.

  7. #7
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    Beefy, using your formula a "120 Gb Drive" actually has 111.758 real GB & solves the missing 9 GB question.

  8. #8
    Beefy Guest

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    hey, it actually works. :)

  9. #9
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    And the larger the drive the larger the loss. ;)


  10. #10
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    Jul 2002
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    Correct as always Wiggo.

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