Please report all spam threads, posts and suspicious members. We receive spam notifications and will take immediate action!
Page 3 of 6 FirstFirst 12345 ... LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 55

Thread: R420 Loki




  1. #21
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    175

    Default

    amen to that.:thumb: thats the first thing that came to mind when i saw it lol.
    ASUS P4S800 motherboard
    P4 2.4ghz 800mhz fsb HT @ 2.84
    geiL 512 PC3200 RAM
    80GB 7200RPM HDD
    PowerColor Radeon 9600XT
    Sound Blaster Audigy 2
    Creative Inspire 6.1 6600 speakers
    Dell Sony P1110 21'' monitor

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Posts
    1,661

    Default

    R420 taped out?

    As we know, PCI-Express will become Intel replacement bus for both PCI and AGP, allowing a greater bandwidth to and from the graphics card and host system. Its expected that the entire PC market will transition to the new bus over the course of 2004, hence having devices compatible with it will be key – from a financial perspective Research Capital are quite positive on ATI due to the fact that they have already shown working hardware utilising the PCI-Express bus natively.

    The paper states that ATI is expected to bring a full line of PCI-Express parts with the R4xx series, beginning in 2004. They note that the expectation of a PCI-Express product launch will be 6 to 7 months after the showing of silicon at IDF. This being the case, and the first product being the high end part, this could suggest that R420 will be launched in the March to April ’04 timeframe, which would imply that the part has already been taped-out and sent to the fab.

    Beyond 3D

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Posts
    1,661

    Default

    ATI R420 to support 32-bit precision for pixel shaders?
    More details about R420 and R500 transpire


    ATI Technologies COO and President David Orton said last week internal Pixel Shader precision in ATI VPUs will be 32-bit extremely soon. Currently ATI Technologies DirectX 9.0-supporting graphics processors provide only 24-bit internal precision for Pixel Shaders – enough for current shaders and fully corresponding to Microsoft’s requirements, but still lower than generally-recognised 32-bit processing precision.

    Answering questions of PC Watch web-site in Tokyo, Japan, Orton told a number of conceptions regarding future visual graphics processing units. Keeping in mind extreme pace of innovation in the graphics industry, no one expected the President of the world’s leading VPU company to explain anything concrete about the future-generations of VPUs, such as ATI R420, ATI R500 or even ATI R600, but stick to some general conceptions – this is what Mr. Orton managed to do quite well.

    David Orton said that his company does not have plans to keep the internal precision of its Pixel Shader processing unit at 24-bit. He said that soon ATI’s hardware will get 32-bit internal precision, though, he denied to comment in which VPU this new feature will be implemented. Provided that Microsoft requires internal 32-bit precision for its Pixel Shaders 3.0 to be available next year, it is logical to anticipate 32-bit internal precision in ATI’s next-generation ATI R420 graphics processor.

    Currently ATI’s R300, R350, R360, RV350 and RV360 graphics processors used in the RADEON 9500-, RADEON 9600-, RADEON 9700- and RADEON 9800-series of graphics cards support 24-bit internal precision for Pixel Shaders – the minimum precision required by Microsoft Corporation for DirectX 9.0. NVIDIA’s GPUs support 16-bit and 32-bit internal precision for Pixel Shaders.

    ATI Technologies also does not say “no” to 64-bit internal precision, but notes some substantial difficulties with its implementation.

    Talking about longer-term future, Orton indicated Pixel and Vertex Shaders 4.x – a part of DirectX 10 and Longhorn – to be extremely flexible and resemble each other pretty well in terms of formats. This means that graphics processing units will be yet another step closer to central processing units. Moreover, executing units or unit for Pixel Shaders and Vertex Shaders are anticipated to be the same. This may probably concern ATI’s future generations of VPUs – R500 or even R600.

    Orton warned about too rapid process of innovation – according to the President of ATI, this may harm industry more than it may benefit. A very serious problem with technology improvement is ability of software makers to keep the same pace and not to be a couple of steps behind the hardware. Another issue is the necessity to shrink the size of graphics chips to keep their cost at an affordable level. One more concern is the cost of memory – 256-bit bus will stay here for long and graphics companies will have to develop and utilise high-speed, but cost effective types of DRAM, including GDDR-II and GDDR3.

    Basically, all the issues mentioned above mean that graphics technology cycles are very likely to last about 18 to 24 months, not 6 to 12 month, as before, just as Mr. Orton indicated earlier this year. Furthermore, it means that revolutions in hardware are not very likely to happen frequently than once every 18 to 24 months.

    xbit

  4. Default

    Basically, all the issues mentioned above mean that graphics technology cycles are very likely to last about 18 to 24 months, not 6 to 12 month, as before, just as Mr. Orton indicated earlier this year. Furthermore, it means that revolutions in hardware are not very likely to happen frequently than once every 18 to 24 months.
    Thats great! Finally I may be justified in spending 450 us dollars on a video card, if its gonna be top of the line for 2 years, and mid range for another 2. Would pretty much make a video card a once a system rebuild purchase. Nice for all us Enthusiasts. Also, more time for them to optimize drivers.
    The FatGuy's Rig:

    <small>AMD 1600+ XP O/C'd to 1560 mhz // Thermaltake Volcano 7+ // Aopen AK77 Pro K266(A) Chipset O/C'd to 147 mhz // 256MB Elixir PC2100 DDR CAS2 // Visiontek GeForce4 Ti4200 O/C'd to 310/580 w/ Thermaltake HSU // SoundBlaster Audigy X-Gamer // WD205BA 20GB 7200 // Sony 52x/24x/52x // Linksys 10/100 NIC // ThermalTake 480w Butterfly PSU // Silver Windowed Aluminum Mid-Tower Case (Modded) // Vantec Nexus Fan Controller// Thermaltake 80mm Blower // 3xEvercool 80mm Fans // 2xBlue Cold Cathodes // 2xSound activated Blue Cold Cathodes // Dell 17" Monitor // Microsoft Trackball // Creative 5.1 Speakers</small>

    Come Crunch with TweakTown

    <img src="http://www.statgfx.com/statgfx/folding/?&username=FatGuy3&border=0,0,0&custom =0,0,255&label=0,0,0&header=255,0,0&st ats=0,0,255&trans=yes&template=fah_origina l&.jpg" alt="www.Statgfx.com" />

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Quebec, Canada
    Posts
    1,369

    Default

    Originally posted by [b]Fatguy3
    Thats great! Finally I may be justified in spending 450 us dollars on a video card, if its gonna be top of the line for 2 years, and mid range for another 2. Would pretty much make a video card a once a system rebuild purchase. Nice for all us Enthusiasts. Also, more time for them to optimize drivers.
    :bounce: Sweet ! Games might actually start to use "current" technology. It's about time.
    SPAM Special Ops

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Quebec, Canada
    Posts
    1,369

    Default

    Will there still be the usual "refreshed cards" ?
    SPAM Special Ops

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Posts
    1,661

    Default

    E^vol: ATI is already working to a 18 month cycle, where as Nvidia continues to employ a 12 month cycle. ATI: R300 (new core) - 6 months - R350 (refresh) - 6 months - R360 (refresh) - 6 months - R420 (new core) Nvidia: NV35 (new core) - 6 months - NV38 (refresh) - 6 months - NV40 (new core). Clearly if XGI (for example) produced a superior product, then neither ATI or Nvidia could afford to wait 24 or 12 months respectively to respond. So I guess it works in theory, but how well will work under real market conditions, time will tell. But to answer your question, yes I think we will still see refresh releases.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Posts
    1,661

    Default

    ATI to mass produce R420 graphics chip in 1Q

    ATI Technologies is expected to enter volume production of its R420 graphics chip core as early as the end of the first quarter, according to local industry sources.

    The R420 will be fabricated at Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company (TSMC) using a low-k process technology. The graphics chip core is expected to boast 160 million transistors and support an AGP 8x bus and GDDR3 memory architecture. The product name is currently unknown.

    Nvidia is expected to launch its comparable product (the NV40) around the same time. Not much is known about the NV40, except that it will also support the AGP 8x bus and be made using a 0.13-micron process.

    The two graphics chip giants both chose to use the more mature 0.13-micron manufacturing processes for their high-end products. Local card makers explained that this may be due to concerns about performance stability and production costs. ATI is said to be using a 0.11-micron process for production of its mainstream RV370 graphics chip.

    DigiTimes

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Posts
    1,661

    Default

    ATI's R420 silicon ships to partners
    ATI ahead of Nvidia


    We revealed last week that the Nvidia NV40 chip had taped out. And now we know ATI's R420 has not only taped out but is a step ahead of the competition.
    While ATI's R420 taped out about the same time as Nvidia's chip in December, it is ready to ship some samples of the chip to its manufacturers. We believe Nvidia will not send such samples to its manufacturers until the end of February.

    This means that ATI could have a one month lead in development, with the whole supply chain preparing to make printed circuit boards using the R420.

    While ATI's most recent silicon isn't as fast as the A2 silicon that comes later, it is apparently good enough to finish designing the graphics chip into boards.

    Both ATI and Nvidia are expected to launch the chips at this year's CeBIT show, while they will both just have a few working cards. The cards using the new graphics technology is likely to become available in shops in April/May.

    It's simply too early to say what chip frequencies these new introductions will have.

    But one thing is already clear. ATI and Nvidia will be fighting hammer and tongs over technologies which are spookily similar in specification and functions.

    The Inquirer

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Posts
    1,661

    Default

    R420 to support DDR, DDR II and GDDR 3
    Preparing for future DRAM marchitecture


    ATI'S team headed by Dave Orton team has no intention of slowing down after its successful coup with the R300.
    You will be run over if you stop for even a second in the graphics business and even R420 is still not totally cast in stone.

    Someone at ATI is thinking of the next speed update of this chip that should come roughly six months after.

    ATI is acting far sightedly. It will have support for all memory marchitectures in R420 as the chip will support DDR1 and that could mean cheaper cards, it will support DDR 2 that will be the memory of choice for this chip and then there's GDDR3 memory, which could be used in future speed upgrades of the R4x0 family.

    We understand that the initial R420 will use DDR 2 memory which is finally stable and available, and can deliver over 1000MHz.

    The R300, R350 and consequently R360 also had support for DDR 1 and DDR 2 as R350 had its DDR II version following introduction of R350, Radeon 9800 PRO 128 MB DDR 1 few months earlier.

    The R420 will have 256 bit memory interface that can always be cut up to 128 bits if you need that.

    The Inquirer

Page 3 of 6 FirstFirst 12345 ... LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •