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Thread: PCI Express




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    <center>Graphics for PCI Express to pose real cooling problems
    Intel Developer Forum 75W imposes special case designs</center>

    THREE LUMINARIES from ATI, Nvidia and Intel will today underline the benefits they believe PCI Express will bestow on graphics performance.
    Jeffrey Cheng from ATI, Michael Abel from INTC and David Reed from Nvidia all agree that the faster bus will give better bandwidth and scalability, allow large request size and pipeline depths, and give isochronous support. The bandwidth will deliver simultaneous 8GB/s concurrent peak bandwidth in X16 mode. PCI Express will also provide a pipeline depth of up to 256.

    Graphics cards using PCI Express tech will, however, require 75 watts max, and that means a few things. First, the 12 volts on an ATX power supply won't do the trick. The answer will be to use a 2x12 connector with the same pinouts as server SSIs, which requires a 300W power supply.

    The other problem is that machines will need to use side panel vents, ducting, and use large fans.

    Cheng will claim that the entire graphics industry will be "reset", AGP will die, and new features will "open doors" for emerging graphics and multimedia apps. A PCI Express graphics card, however, will run at PCI compatible mode, with few software changes.

    There are some clear differences between managing non-local memory in PCI Express, however. Developers have to check 64-bit compliance.

    The Inquirer

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    <center><img src="http://images.tweaktown.com/news/news_ati-pci-express.jpg"> </center>

    ATI Technologies Inc. is demonstrating the world’s first visual processor to incorporate PCI Express, the newest PC interconnect standard, at the Intel Developers Forum (IDF) in San Jose.
    ATI has designed, developed and validated in tests with Intel, the industry’s first visual processor using the brand-new PCI Express bus to accelerate the movement of information between the visual processor and the central processor.

    “PCI Express is the most significant transition the PC industry has undergone in the past decade. We already have working silicon that uses PCI Express natively,” said Rick Bergman, Senior Vice President of Marketing and General Manager, Desktop, ATI Technologies Inc. “As the industry transitions to PCI Express and as chipset and motherboard companies make this new interconnect available to customers, ATI will be ready with visual processors that can take advantage of the advanced capabilities.”

    ATI has been a key player in the development of PCI Express standards since its inception, first sitting on the original steering committee and continuing to influence and support the PCI Special Interest Group (PCI-SIG).

    “ATI is demonstrating the world's first PCI Express visual processor on multiple Intel platforms at Fall IDF,” Randy Wilhelm, Vice President of the Client Platform Division at Intel Corporation. “By validating its products with Intel’s PCI Express development platforms, ATI will help ensure interoperability that will benefit the end user’s experience.”

    ATI press release

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    <center>PCI Express Goes Live!</center>

    If you are a computer enthusiast, then you should be very excited to learn that Intel does care a lot about awesome graphics performance and the next generation I/O standards. Today we could cast a glance at the first public demonstration of a Prescott based system with PCI Express graphics card running Half Life 2.

    Xbit

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    A bit off topic, but what are those 2 big HSF's on the mobo ? Surely it's not for dual prescott cpu's...is it ?
    SPAM Special Ops

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    E^vol: It's an Intel dual Prescott prototype workstation motherboard based around the Tumwater chipset.

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    :drool:

    I wonder what the heck that is capable of! (3dMark2001 benches in 30K's? :D )

    Off topic, but these are bugging me: When is PCI-Express going to be available on most new mobos? And are PCI-Express cards going to follow suit at the same time? And are the prescott processors 32 bit or 64 bit? Thx! : peace2: Mista K6
    Modified Dell 8200 Case:
    -400MHz FSB i850 Intel mobo
    -P4 Williamette Socket 478, 1.9GHz
    -768MB 16-bit PC800 RDRAM
    -MSI GF4 Ti4200 128MB @ 284/581
    -7200 RPM Maxtors: 60GB (2MB) on mobo and 160GB (8MB) on ATA/133 PCI Card
    -Creative Inspire T7700 7.1 Speaker System on an Audigy 2
    -Windows XP Home Edition SP2

    Rock on : peace2: , MiStA K6

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    Mista K6: Sorry I can't help you with 3DMark2001 scores, but they're certain to be impressive. PCI-Express motherboards and graphics cards will arrive together, probably late Q1 2004 in limited supplies. Intel's Prescott processor is 32bit and will be available from Q4 2003. Availability: 3.2 & 3.4Ghz in Oct 2003, 3.6Ghz - Q1 2004, 3.8Ghz - Q2 2004. Pricing: 3.2Ghz - $278, 3.4Ghz - $417, 3.6Ghz - $637, 3.8Ghz - $637 (For guidance only)

    Update: According to The Inquirer, the Prescott does have 64bit compatibility, but Intel is sitting on it because of its Itanium processor. Clearly if this is true, then Intel will be carefully monitoring the success of AMD's Athlon 64 range over the coming months.

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    Originally posted by [b]weta
    The other problem is that machines will need to use side panel vents, ducting, and use large fans.
    Hmmm....More heat....:confused: : omg:
    SPAM Special Ops

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    The only thing I don't like about the new Prescotts is they still use a 200mhz FSB, which means the multiplier on the low end chip (3.2) is 16. This is not good for overclocking.

    Where my 2.4c @ 3.2 has a total system bus of 1068mhz, the Prescott will only have 800. With a locked multi of 16 and high heat output, I don't think it will be a good overclocker without a Peltier cooling setup, despite its .09 micron process.

    FX5900 - 3DMark2001 [20,566] - 3DMark2003 [7,281] - Aquamark3 [56,694]
    Ti4400 - 3DMark2001 [16,028]

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    <center>PCI Express x16 details uncovered
    Hot, big, powerful graphics cards to come
    </center>

    We managed to find out some details in regards PCI Express bus for graphics during the Intel Developer Forum sessions today. The PCI Express x16 bus will not only provide more bandwidth, power, but will also add certain functionality to the data transfer protocols that could really boost performance in some cases, it transpired. Understanding the issues and problems with modern GPUs, Intel also offers some design recommendations for more efficient cooling.

    Intel suggests that future generations of graphics processors designed for PCI Express x16 interconnection will consume more energy than current GPUs and VPUs. As a result, the PCI Express x16 slot used for graphics will provide up to 75W of power for the next-generations of graphics cards. Keeping in mind that even current high-end graphics cards consume up to 200W, we suggest that future products of the same kind will require additional power connectors for sure and they will hardly take advantage of more power provided by the PCI Express x16. Nevertheless, we should keep in mind that power consumption of the upcoming entry-level and mainstream devices will surely also increase dramatically in future and they will benefit from the new standard, at least, they now have a headroom for such increase because of PCI Express x16.

    In order to cool down the hot GPUs and VPUs of the future, Intel recommends using a special heatsink with openings for cool air intake and hot air exhaust. The company also recommends computer case manufacturers to install a special side-panel vent to pump cool air into the case for more efficient graphics card’s cooling. Obviously, coolers on the graphics cards will intake cool air from the air blast by the side-panel vent and then exhaust hot air inside the computer case. So to minimize fan noises, Intel suggests implementing temperature monitoring systems. To tell you the truth, such kind of cooling is already in use, but after Intel’s recommendations it will become an industry standard, I think.

    Since PCI Express inherited a lot from the good-old PCI, the support for the former can be easily added into today’s unified AGP drivers. However, it will not be compatible with AGP and, as ATI said, the graphics industry will be “reset” by PCI Express introduction.

    Markham, Ontario-based graphics company also named some potential Future GPU applications enabled by PCI Express. The list includes the following:

    Production-grade video editing
    Consistent capability and performance with massive monitor-array architecture (MMAA)
    Hot-plugging graphics is a possibility
    VPU as a co-processor

    An NVIDIA representative also added that efficient management of data transaction by the software could boost the performance by as much as 10%.

    Xbit

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