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Thread: Swapping mobo with 'old' winXP




  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
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    Hello.

    I am not sure if the subject says it all but I am going to replace my old PIII and Abit BH6 system with XP1700+ and Epox 8RDA.

    I am not really looking for clean windowsXP install since I have so much stuff on my harddrive. And settings (adsl,lan etc) that are tuned just right

    My friend recently upgraded his old MSI kt266 Pro mobo to Asus A7N8X and his cousins kt266a system to Asus A7V8X without formatting and reinstalling hd's. All he did was use WinXP Pro's repair windows function. So when time came for the 'second boot' he inserted bootable winXp Pro cd and selected repair existing Windows setup.

    Both times no problems what so ever. And he was running the new mobos in record time. Both systems seem to work very well and are posting very good benchmarks.

    Now, I want to try this (heck, why not? Nothing to lose if formatting is the other option anyway right?).
    But going from older pure Intel setup to ultra modern Nforce2 chip with T-bred sounds a bit risky to say atleast.

    I know there is now people who say I am crazy and the only way is the 'clean way' but listen for a sec, its not your 'puter so why not step into my shoes for a minute.

    What kind of precautions or preparations should (could) I make (if any) before I 'hotswap' my motherboard?

    Uninstall something? Install something? All seriously given suggestions are welcome.


    Peace! : peace2:



    Andy

  2. #2

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    It is possible, you can do it with no problem what so ever. HOWEVER if you would like to sit there for like hours and hours on end constantly reinstalling and updating drivers then heh......be my guest. Also your system will run HORRIBLE!! You see the OS will be optimized for your P3 not your AthlonXP. It won't even run like an athlon xp. I mean ya you will notice a huge increase in speed because you are doing a MAJOR hardware upgrade. But it won't be NEARLY as fast as it could be. When my dad upgraded my brother from a K6/2-500MHz to a Duron 750MHz. I had found out my dad didn't format (he's a bit slow). I got on my bro's computer and was like "a duron 750 is faster then this" I told him what the deal was and formatted his comp. And guess what? It was MUCH faster. To the point that he claimed before I formatted he didn't notice much of an increase of course the difference between a k6/2-500 and a duron 750 is not as severe as a p3 vs athlon xp.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
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    thanks for your quick answer ReSpAwN DeMoN.

    I know straight swap would most likely result a non responding system - thats why I would be using Windows's Repair option like my friend did.

    This is where Windows checks your hardware configuration (just like in fresh install) and then (re)installs all the drivers and system files needed. Well, in theory.

    Thats why I asked if anyone would have any advice how to make it more succesfull.

    Well, my new hardware won't be arriving before next week so I still have time to change my mind.



    Andy

  4. #4

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    Oh well in that case......I STRONGLY recommend you go with a fresh load. Your going with a HUUUUUGE upgrade here. You might as well feel its effects.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
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    Look the obvious answer is to install your new hardware then reformat and reinstall Windows. That is what everyone is going to tell you, and that is precisely what I recommend to you.

    There are no "precautions" I can think of which will prevent you likely having a having a large number of unexplainable problems (like bluescreens/crashes) if you maintain your current Windows install with new hardware.

    Perhaps once you install your new hardware, and Windows detects and install the new drivers for it, make a new System Restore point. Also use a registry cleaner like RegCleaner (link and instructions in my XP Guide), and go to Device Manager and uninstall as many devices as you can.

    One of the biggest reasons for reformatting and reinstalling with new PC hardware (especially the motherboard) is that I've found out recently you can't reallocate IRQs successfully unless you do a reinstall of Windows. So if you're unlucky enough to have conflicting IRQs - which is likely - you can't do much about it with an old install of Windows.

    Think about it, the choice is up to you.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
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    Thanks for your answer PersianImmortal.

    I know the fresh install is what everyone is telling me to do and yes I have read your windowsXP install guide and find it very good.

    I have build last 4 of my pc's from the scratch so little experimenting isn't what I am afraid of. It seems that I might end up getting a new hard drive for this pc as well and in that case I do not think cloning my excisting hard drive would make any sense so fresh install it's gonna be then.

    But, I will try that repair windows option first, run few benchmarks like PCMark and 3DMark just so I can compare some of the numbers with the fresh install.

    What I just hate is that the installation or assemply of the new pc usually take like an hour but finding ,installing and patching all the programs you had before (40+gigs, no games, movies or porn) ... takes all weekend "sighs" ..


    aNdy

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
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    I know it's a big pain in the butt...that's one of the reasons I wrote my first XP Guide...so that after a reformat you can rapidly apply all the performance tweaks from one guide instead of looking around for all of em.

    However it's a good investment in the long run for you, because a few weeks down the track when you're going crazy trying to figure out why a program keeps crashing or giving you bluescreen errors, you'll wind up reinstalling anyway.

    My best suggestion is in the future, if you can (and haven't already), get a CD burner. Keep all the programs and patches you download in a separate directory and burn them to disk. That's what I do, so I don't have to redownload hundreds of megabytes of programs, patches and whatnot.

    Also remember that WinXP SP1 has all the major Windows updates up to its release late last year, so download and install that immediately after a reformat and reinstall and you'll only have a handful of MS updates to install from there on.

    Good luck either way!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
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    Quote Originally Posted by PersianImmortal


    Also remember that WinXP SP1 has all the major Windows updates up to its release late last year, so download and install that immediately after a reformat and reinstall and you'll only have a handful of MS updates to install from there on.

    Good luck either way!

    Thanks, I recently made myself SP1 intergrated version of my WinXP Pro (bootable) so thats one big download less.

    :cheers:


    aNdy

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
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    I upgraded from a PIII and asus mobo to a 1600+ and an asus mobo. I used the repair feature, it has been running for 3 days without a problem.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
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    Just a follow up ...

    I got my my Epox 8RDA board, 1700+ and 512Mb of pc2700 memory (Green).

    In about thirty mins I was re-installing windowsXP with the repair option. Everything went smoothly. I installed latest Nforce2 drivers and latest bios. Then (or maybe before?) I suddenly encountered unexpected (and dreaded) freeze. Everything froze. Well, I thought nothing and just restarted the pc.
    About an hour later another freeze... and again and again.

    Well, needless to say I thought my repair winblows had failed. I formatted drive c and proceed with clean install. Finished it and my pc froze again. I installed older bios but it didn't help. I upgraded my 300W powersupply to 360W one but it didn't help.
    I went back to the store and changed the memory to Samsung ones. but no, still got unexpected freezes.

    I tried playing with drivers and another videocard .. nope.

    The trouble was that I could not make it happed twice in a row .. it was totally random - from 2 mins into windows to hour and half. I had older 800Mhz thunderbird (200fsb) lying around so I swapped that in but no, it wasn't a faulthy cpu or cooling ...

    Well, at this point I had changed or swiched every other part except the hard drive and the motherboard. I didn't really think it would be the mobo since I could run all the benchmarks I could think of and even get great results - also fail safe or turbo settings did nothing.

    All that work for nothing ... it was the motherboard. I took it back and got 8RDA+ in change since they were out of plain rda ones.

    I threw it in and from the first boot it ran flawlessly. Didn't need to even reinstall one driver. (I later did reinstall Nforce drivers just to be sure)

    Fortunately this story had the happy ending. And I have to agree with PersianImmortal with one thing ... clean install is the only sensible way to go. Sure you need to do a lot more work but that clean windows feeling is something you simply cannot recreate with repairs, cleaners or tweakers ..



    The end.


    ..now I'll have few of these





    Andy

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